Letters to the editor: May 9 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: May 9

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Posted: Friday, May 9, 2008 12:42 am | Updated: 9:59 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

TAXES

Can reduce them only so far

I’m responding to Tom Patterson in Opinion 2 on April 28. He stated, “There were no Bush tax cuts for the rich.” The real truth, but never spoken, is that the tax cuts were a way of reducing the surplus left by a previous administration so that the “entitlements” were put in jeopardy. This opened the door for the privatizing of Social Security. Social Security was in no danger of collapsing with that surplus.

Patterson’s statement that over the past 30 years tax cuts have increased revenues is only partly true. It sounds like he is basing that statement on the Laffer Curve, which is flawed. It is true in the short run because of the pent-up demand for lower affected taxes. Market forces readjust over time to reduce income.

Consider it in the extreme: if there were zero taxes, there would be no government, no public education, no police, etc. With taxes, we get government to decide on the use of public money. This is the heart of the problem. What is the best solution for the redistribution of wealth? The two primary thoughts are the greater good or corporate welfare. I’ve chosen the greater good.

VINCE PELLECHIA

CHANDLER

EDUCATION

Limit government control

Ask the wrong questions and you will get the wrong answers. Many of the proposals lawmakers put forward attempt to clarify how the government ought to run and fund every institution within its jurisdiction. For example, Senate Bill 1108 promoted by Rep. Russell Pearce, R-Mesa, addresses what teachers should and should not teach in class. Then the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 intervenes in classrooms from a federal level.

The question has been how the government ought to run some aspect of our lives and no one is happy with the answers. When dealing with any issue we should ask something more basic. Should the government run this particular aspect of our lives at all? If there is a place for the law, how extensive should it be? I personally think teachers, students, and parents can manage their classes better than the lawmakers in Phoenix or Washington.

TODD DECKER

MESA

TEMPE COUNCIL ELECTION

Vote ‘no’ for Navarro, Woods

Tempe City Council candidates Joel Navarro and Corey Woods are the last people the citizens of Tempe need running our government. I’ve listened to and read Navarro’s and Woods’ positions on various issues. It’s obvious these two want to increase our already outrageously high property and sales taxes and city fees.

These are unnecessary increases at a time when most people are already having trouble making their my monthly bills due to sky-high increases in mortgage, gasoline, food and utility costs, to name a few. Everything seems to be going up except working people’s paychecks.

What I find outrageous is the average salary and benefits for the approximately 2,000 Tempe City employees is more than $90,000, or two to three times the U.S. national average for working people. Tempe taxpayers and voters deserve a lot better. We deserve to have the $12 million to $14 million Tempe has overtaxed us be refunded. We deserve to have our high taxes and fees be reduced by cutting the over-bloated staff and salaries.

It’s time for Tempe citizens to be heard and represented, not the special interest groups like the Tempe police, fire and employee unions.

A.J. LAFARO

TEMPE

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Bill would strangle job growth

Your story about Qwest’s attempt to re-write the nation’s telecom laws in its favor (“Qwest wants to shed U.S. regulations,” April 24) overlooked how the real victims of the Bell’s gambit would be the Phoenix region’s small businesses and households taxed with higher rates and fewer options for broadband service.

Hispanics in the United States are opening businesses at a rate that is three times as fast as the national average. For this remarkable growth to continue, competition must flourish in the market for broadband and voice services that are now the lubricant for entrepreneurship in the 21st century.

But allowing Qwest to lobby the Federal Communications Commission for approval to stifle competition — where data shows Qwest continues to control more than 95 percent of the coveted “last mile” — would certainly set the region back decades in its progress towards robust economic development. The Arizona Corporation Commission is on record as opposed to this petition — and in favor of competitive options for our region’s job creators. Where are our other leaders?

ARTHUR GARCIA

PHOENIX

RETIRING

Mr. Foley seeking students

I am retiring from the Mesa Unified School District in a few weeks after more than 33 years in education. After two years teaching seventh grade in Holland, N.Y., I came to Mesa and taught reading at Carson Junior High School for a semester, then ninth-grade English at Poston Junior High. I then became a school counselor and worked at Mesa Vo-Tech, then Dobson High, and now Brimhall Junior High.

I am so thankful for the opportunity I have had of working with young people and adults who care about them. Anything you can think of has happened to my kids. They have died, committed suicide and been murdered. They have gone to jail for murder. They have been raped, physically abused and emotionally abused. Parents and siblings have died, been killed, committed suicide, done drugs and gone to jail. They have dealt with returning combat vets, divorce, and terminal illness. They have been kidnapped and had babies of their own while still in school. They have also gone on to raise families, get doctorates, become veterans, and generally be productive citizens.

I have had the privilege of working with the children of former students and have had former students as fellow educators. It has been a wonderful and rewarding career.

I would love to hear from former students and colleagues. Please contact me and let me know how you are doing. Write to me at Brimhall Junior High School, 4949 E. Southern Ave., Mesa, AZ, 85206. I have run into a few former students over the years, and it is wonderful to see how they have turned out.

BOB FOLEY

COUNSELOR, BRIMHALL JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

MESA

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