Letters to the editor: June 2 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: June 2

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Posted: Monday, June 2, 2008 10:55 pm | Updated: 11:57 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

County attorney race

Richard clear choice for Dems

I agree wholeheartedly with the Tribune editorial (May 25) that voters need to look beyond labels and demand that candidates and their supporters debate “details about their qualifications” instead of “gotcha politics.”

I hope voters apply that lesson to both county attorney candidate Tim Nelson and his Democratic primary opponent, Gerald Richard.

Tim Nelson’s biography lists 12 years as a lawyer representing Fortune 500 corporations, three years doing anti-trust lawsuits for the attorney general’s office, and five years as legal counsel to the governor. There’s no criminal prosecution experience, even though the county attorney’s office is all about prosecuting criminals.

Gerald Richard has worked in law enforcement longer than Nelson has been a lawyer. He has actually prosecuted felony criminals before a jury as a deputy Maricopa county attorney. As director of the Phoenix Police Department, he has the experience of managing hundreds of employees and overseeing budgets totaling more than $130 million dollars.

Yes, voters need to debate qualifications, including those of the Democratic candidates for county attorney, one of whom is qualified for the position and one who is not.

Kathleen A. Winn

Mesa

Illegal immigration

Greatness based on laws

The ridiculous statement, included in a May 3 letter, that our “representatives seek to divide, repudiate and punish whole groups of citizens based on culture and race” needs to be re-evaluated.

I too, find it necessary to speak out with hopes of enlightening and educating.

Our country is great because it was founded on law. Those persons of whatever race and culture who disrespect our laws by illegally entering into this country should be actively pursued and deported.

Lawbreakers, defined as criminals, are not welcome. Anyone who wishes to legally migrate into this country is more than welcome and invited to follow the rules to becoming citizens.

Our law-abiding citizens are proud of our mixed heritage and culture.

Thanks again to all local, state and federal law enforcement officers who willingly, daily, put their lives on the line for our safety.

We especially give tribute and memorialize those who have died in that cause.

M.D. Banks

Mesa

Adoption

Law aids youngest children

Arizona’s youngest children removed from their homes by Child Protective Services (CPS) will be able to finalize adoption more quickly thanks to a new state law recently signed by Gov. Janet Napolitano.

SB1441, as signed into law, requires the court to change a case plan from reunification to severance and adoption if a parent refuses to take steps to create a safer home within six months and expedites final adoption hearings for children under age 3 to within ninety days of receipt of an adoption petition.

Imagine how long this process must seem in the eyes of a child younger than 3 years old. There is no reason that any vulnerable child whose parents continually refuse to create a safer environment should wait a year before severance proceedings begin. Worse, when a parent refuses to participate in CPS services, it can take up to two years for CPS and the courts to place the children with a permanent family.

Arizona’s children waiting for a loving home are penalized twice. First, by having parents that will not get their act together and second, by a system that kept them tied to negligent parents, sometimes longer than a prospective adoptive family would like to wait.

There are many children in Arizona waiting for adoption, but because of the difficulty, some prospective parents may turn to international adoption.

Our process of adoption is a long and difficult one, but with this change, we alleviate some of the difficulty in the process of helping our children in Arizona find stable homes.

Sen. Leah Landrum Taylor

D-Phoenix

Light bulbs

CFLs’ screwy logic

I read with interest the letter of May 12, where the author wrote of knowing the dangers of the new “energy savings” light bulbs, but believes that the benefits of using them outweigh the risks.

Always interested in a lower electric bill, we purchased our first big package of the CFL flood lamps about two years ago. Recently, after the third one burned out in my kitchen I became interested in learning more about these bulbs that lasted far less time than our old incandescent lamps. Depending on the packaging, in big bold lettering you read “lasts up to five years, seven years, or three times longer!” In fine print you read, “based on normal household use of 2-4 hours per day.” Perhaps that is the normal daily use in China where the bulbs are manufactured.

Next, I found in smaller print “contains mercury.” That information should be in big bold lettering, as mercury is very dangerous to humans. Light bulbs can break easily so the risk of being exposed is very high. Then, I realized of course that we should not be throwing these bulbs into our regular trash containers. Instead we need to save them and dispose of them at certain hazardous waste locations, the closest one to my home is eight miles one way.

So, in discovering that these bulbs are more expensive, very hazardous, don’t last longer, are dimmer and cost more to dispose of, we have decided to go back to the incandescent bulbs. For those who still wish to follow the trend, check out the history of the term “mad hatter.” Mercury is known to make people go insane. Maybe those people pushing them are already there.

Julie Farnsworth

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Attorney General Forum - Question 1

Attorney General candidates Republican Mark Brnovich and Democrat Felecia Rotellini debate at ...

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