Letters to the editor: March 8 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: March 8

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Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2009 8:28 pm | Updated: 12:51 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

IMMIGRATION

E-Verify should be law

It is utterly appalling that “our” Democratic congressmen and women (under the cover of darkness and secrecy) have stripped the E-Verify provision from the “stimulus bill.” This provision had been included by a majority of the House of Representatives when the bill was originally drafted.

The result of this action will enable illegal immigrants to be granted whatever jobs might be created by the “stimulus” legislation. Many of the jobs to be created appear to be in infrastructure maintenance, repair and construction.

Construction jobs, according to President Barack Obama’s top advisors, will be granted to applicants other than “white construction workers.” Without a requirement that the citizenship status of applicants be verified, the contractors accomplishing such infrastructure work will be able to hire inexperienced workers at a low pay scale. Illegal immigrant applicants will certainly be employed.

When so many American citizens are without employment, it is impossible to understand how our representatives could and would make a great many jobs available to illegal immigrants and foreign workers.

We all need to remember this when these congressmen and women seek re-election.

E.S. KRAFT

MESA

MARICOPA COUNTY SHERIFF

Federal judge has no conflict

I am the president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza, the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S. My sister Mary happens to be a federal judge.

In response to the Tribune’s Feb. 27 story “Sheriff: Remove judge from profiling case,” I must be clear that we both take our responsibilities seriously.

It is my job to call attention to hate crimes, unbalanced media coverage, and racial profiling targeting the Hispanic community. In that context, NCLR’s views on Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s tactics are a matter of public record and can be found at www.WeCanStopTheHate.org.

Just as I have every intention of fulfilling my job responsibilities, I know that my sister will do her job to ensure that justice is administered fairly and impartially.

JANET MURGUIA

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA, WASHINGTON, D.C.

SHOPPING

Visit the grocery store early

In response to the March 1 Vent item on retired people staying out of grocery stores at certain times: Excuse me! But I have every right to be shopping whenever I need to.

However, I try to stay away during the more congested times, not for you, but for me so that I don’t have to put up with your nasty attitude and hyper screaming kids who have been locked up in day care all day. Why not get up a little earlier (I’ll still be asleep) and go before work. I did, it’s a marvelous time to shop.

NANCY HAZEN

MESA

THE ECONOMY

Let judges modify mortgages

I am writing to applaud President Barack Obama for resolving to move with urgency to address this nation’s foreclosure crisis.

An astounding 6,600 American families are losing their homes to foreclosure each and every day. As a bankruptcy attorney, I see the real-world impact on families, neighborhoods and communities of our failure to date to stem the tide of foreclosures. Currently, bankruptcy as it now stands makes it difficult, if not impossible, to help many of my clients save their homes.

Client R is trying to save his home that has been in his family since his father raised his family in it. He does not want to file bankruptcy, but due to the depressed economy, this self-employed contractor has had his income drop so low that he can no longer make the payments on his house. Its value is now far below the mortgage. He has been working with his bank for six months now to try and restructure his mortgage, but no help has been offered.

Client K, an accountant, filed Chapter 13 reorganization bankruptcy with me, hoping to keep her house by paying off a portion of her other debt in Chapter 13 so she could afford her house payments, which I cannot modify. Her adjustable rate mortgage kicked in and increased her payment so much that she could not afford it. She tried without success to get the bank to restructure her mortgage, and she has now surrendered her home.

Under the current bankruptcy law, I am powerless to help these clients. Now, however, Obama has called for legislation that would allow for judicial modification of home mortgages. This solution, unlike every other solution put forward to date, comes at absolutely no cost to U.S. taxpayers. This is one solution we know will work. Courts should be empowered to implement economically rational loan modifications where the parties are unwilling or unable to do so on their own.

HAROLD E. CAMPBELL

MESA

'DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL’

Forces too much secrecy

I’ve served in the Army and spent more time than I care to recall in close quarters with platoon mates, in barracks and in the field. Some of us were gay, and those who were served with no less honor or distinction than those who were not.

The only difference was that they had to keep secrets. This policy harms the cohesiveness of our military, since those who feel the call to serve despite discrimination against them must maintain a certain reserve and distance from their fellows.

President Barack Obama rightly promised to end “don’t ask, don’t tell” as an official military policy. As far as I’m concerned, the end of this discriminatory, divisive, shameful and harmful policy is long overdue.

BRENDA RUSSELL

CHANDLER

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