Letters to the editor: March 1 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: March 1

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Posted: Sunday, March 1, 2009 8:07 pm | Updated: 2:09 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

MARRIAGE

Recognizing gay couples has consequences

In his letter to the editor, Lloyd Dickson asks, “What do people have to be afraid of if gay marriage is legalized ('Opposition rises from prejudice against gays,’ Feb. 8)?”

In this case, the law of physics will be put into play: “For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.” If gay marriage is legalized, parents will lose the privilege of having their children obtain a public education without teachers being allowed or required to teach them that gay marriage is acceptable.

Also churches could lose the right to refuse to perform gay marriages without being sued. These concerns are not far-fetched. These things were already happening in Massachusetts and California where gay marriage was permitted.

Furthermore, I believe that homosexual activity is wrong. Therefore, it is even more wrong to legalize such marriages. Gay marriage is an attack on the family and upon family values.

I, personally, get along fine with gays. As with anyone else, I recognize each one as an individual and appreciate each one for their good character traits and many fine values. But I don’t embrace their gay lifestyle. There are gay factions who resort to name calling, defamation, violence and property damage toward those who stand up for what they believe, as we saw happen in California when Proposition 8 was passed.

GREG LeCHEMINANT

GILBERT

TRIBUNE

Change hasn’t been good

I remember an American tradition that has gone on since at least the turn of the 20th century — having the morning paper in front of your house to read before heading to work.

It kept you up to date and provided you with the opportunity to carry out an intelligent conversation with your co-workers about current events. For more than 20 years, the Tribune provided me with just that.

Now, I suppose it’s just evolution that part of our culture is gone. The Tribune only comes a couple of times during the work week and since it is now free, customer service is a nonissue — it shows up whenever the spirit moves somebody.

The Tribune Web site is nothing more than an exercise in frustration: besides being slower than molasses you are forced to look at ads; sometimes the only way out is to shut off the computer and start over.

Oh well, this is all another chapter of American life, one must accept the bad with the good.

CHRIS ALTSTOCK

GILBERT

Joy brought on by venting

My uncle, Orlis Howe, read the Vent every day. It was his favorite part of the Tribune. When I would come for visits, he would use the articles in the Vent as discussion or argument throughout our day. My uncle passed from this life to a better one on Feb. 18. He will be greatly missed by his family.

Thank you for the joy you have brought to him over the years.

LYNNE McDONOUGH

HARTS, W. VA.

BORDER CONTROL

Farmers need immigration reform

Local and national news outlets are reporting on a current U.S. District Court jury trial that involves a rancher being sued for detaining illegal immigrants as they crossed his ranch.

It is unfortunate Roger Barnett felt compelled to use force to protect his family and property when he detained individuals trespassing on his land until proper authorities arrived. I trust that court system weighed the facts and dealt equitably with the issue before the court.

But enough is enough.

The organization I represent, Arizona Farm Bureau, has many members who live near the Mexican border. From Yuma to Douglas, they tell of the same frustration of illegal migration across their farms and ranches leaving cut fences, open gates and trash behind. They tell of break-ins and coming upon heavily armed drug runners and human smugglers. They also tell of the human suffering when they find those who die on their rangeland or those who knock on their door for food and water because they are lost or have been abandoned by their “guide.”

Blame for this problem is laid directly at the feet of our Congress because of inaction on the immigration issue. Without securing the border to thwart all illegal activity and updating our worker visa system, border residents will continue to have unwanted and dangerous traffic across their farms and ranches.

The border needs to be secured in conjunction with an updated visa system that allows legal access through the border for temporary and permanent workers. Workers that our U.S. Department of Labor has determined are needed and do not replace willing American workers. Workers that will be employed by businesses that have demonstrated to the U.S. Labor Department that American workers are not available.

An updated and streamlined visa system using new technologies is key to securing the border. This frees up enforcement resources to concentrate on the illegal activity that remains.

KEVIN ROGERS

PRESIDENT, ARIZONA FARM BUREAU

GILBERT

MICHAEL PHELPS

Marijuana doesn’t matter

Michael Phelps is a national hero because of what he did at the Olympics — not what he does in his spare time to himself.

He harmed nobody except potentially himself (“Too immature to be a national hero,” Letters, Feb. 15). Pot users are current and former presidents of the United States, CEOs of major corporations and Olympic champions with 14 gold medals — not just unmotivated losers.

KIRK MUSE

MESA

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