Cheney’s power didn’t extend to pardons - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Cheney’s power didn’t extend to pardons

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Sunday, March 1, 2009 8:09 pm | Updated: 1:32 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

Our View: It turns out President George W. Bush really could say “no” to his powerful vice president, Dick Cheney. And the president did it on a cause dear to the vice president’s heart — a full pardon for his former top aide, I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby.

It turns out President George W. Bush really could say “no” to his powerful vice president, Dick Cheney. And the president did it on a cause dear to the vice president’s heart — a full pardon for his former top aide, I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby.

Libby was convicted of four counts of perjury, obstruction of justice and lying to investigators. Bush commuted Libby’s 30-month prison sentence, but let the convictions stand.

Cheney fiercely lobbied the president for a full pardon, repeatedly bringing up the matter. Finally, according to Tom DeFrank of the New York Daily News, who broke the story last month, “After repeatedly telling Cheney his mind was made up, Bush became so exasperated with Cheney’s persistence he told aides he didn’t want to discuss the matter any further.”

Granting the pardon would have been hypocritical of Bush. In his eight years as president, Bush issued only 189 pardons, less than half the 396 granted by President Bill Clinton and the 393 by President Ronald Reagan.

And Bush was surely cognizant that a last-minute pardon for Libby would invite comparisons with Clinton’s notorious midnight pardons at the end of his presidency.

  • Discuss

Facebook

EastValleyTribune.com on Facebook

Twitter

EastValleyTribune.com on Twitter

Google+

EastValleyTribune.com on Google+

RSS

Subscribe to EastValleyTribune.com via RSS

RSS Feeds

Spacer4px
Your Az Jobs