Mesa firm hangs technology on its walls - East Valley Tribune: News

Mesa firm hangs technology on its walls

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Posted: Wednesday, September 2, 2009 4:02 pm | Updated: 2:22 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

Mike Long has found a new use for old computer parts: turning them into works of art. Long, managing partner of the Valley office of a national technology services company, has adorned the walls of work spaces in his business with circuit boards from old computers, displaying them as works of art while keeping the components stored in a convenient place. 

Mike Long has found a new use for old computer parts: turning them into works of art.

Long, managing partner of the Valley office of a national technology services company, has adorned the walls of work spaces in his business with circuit boards from old computers, displaying them as works of art while keeping the components stored in a convenient place.

"It's visually interesting to look at, and it connotes a high-technology environment," he said.

Long manages the metro Phoenix office of TeamLogicIT at 1959 S. Val Vista Drive in Mesa, providing computer repair and other information technology services for business and residential clients.

His technical work spaces have walls covered with motherboards of various sizes, shapes and colors - leaving no doubt about the type of work done there.

Long said he came up with the idea while rummaging through boxes looking for electronic components. He decided it would be a lot simpler to find the parts if they were stored in plain view.

"I figured this (wall) would be a safe place to store it," he said. "If we need a battery or capacitor, we can take it off the wall."

Other advantages are that it protects the parts from static electricity, which can short out electronic circuits, and it keeps them out of landfills where their potentially toxic heavy metals would threaten the groundwater.

Technicians working for the company said they consider the boards to be works of art.

"You can see all their complexity," network engineer Cesar Rascon said. "When you see it, you appreciate the technology."

Another technician, Mike Gifford, noted that some high-end boards are quite colorful, with red, purple and other colors in the fiberglass boards and components.

"Some PCs have clear sides so you can see inside them, and they are trying to look more appealing," he said.

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