Stardust hauls it all away, even the kitchen sink - East Valley Tribune: Business

Stardust hauls it all away, even the kitchen sink

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Posted: Friday, May 23, 2008 1:03 pm | Updated: 8:52 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

When Lori and Jim Boyd started plans to remodel their Paradise Valley house, expenses added up so quickly it made more sense to demolish it altogether and rebuild.

http://blogs.evtrib.com/fromthegroundup%5C%22" target= "\">Misty Williams on Real Estate

When Lori and Jim Boyd started plans to remodel their Paradise Valley house, expenses added up so quickly it made more sense to demolish it altogether and rebuild.

Misty Williams on Real Estate

But instead of shipping old appliances, cabinets and other leftovers of the gutted house to a landfill, they're donating materials to a nonprofit company that refurbishes and sells building items at a discount.

It's perfect for someone fixing up a starter house, and it generates hope for people in need, Lori Boyd said.

"Giving is something you need to train yourself to do," she said.

The couple and local custom home builder Forté Homes are working with Stardust Building Supplies on the demolition of the more than 3,000-square-foot house.

Founded a decade ago, Stardust sells building supplies at 50 percent to 80 percent below market value. The organization offers everything from windows and doors to ceramic toilets, refrigerators and paint.

Much of the donated material comes from remodeling jobs, said Stardust spokeswoman Sarah Harper. Contractors also contribute new items that they can't use because of wrong orders or sizes, she said.

Harper added that the company is tearing out materials - a service it offers for free - from at least one house every day despite the housing market slowdown.

"People are looking to stay where they are (and remodel) instead of changing homes," said Bob Darre, president of Stardust's board of directors.

Stardust's recycling efforts also have a positive impact on the environment, Darre said. The nonprofit enterprise has diverted roughly 4,000 to 5,000 tons of building material from landfills, he said.

The tax-deductible items donated to Stardust's two Valley warehouses include basic bathtubs that can be resold for $5, a $12,000 toilet and $8,000 hot tub, which were recently donated, Darre said.

"One man's trash is another man's treasure," he said.

Forté Homes, which will soon start work on the Boyds' new house, is focused on the environment, said Forté spokeswoman Yvonne Augustyniak. The Boyds were open to working with Stardust, and Forté hopes another client will also be interested, Augustyniak said.

"It's a great concept," she said.

Stardust also goes into houses and does repairs to make them safer, Harper said. Last year, the group helped more than 90 families through a program known as Angels on Call.

"We'll go in and do the small stuff" from faulty wiring and plumbing to leaky roofs, Harper said.

But they'll also take on large remodeling projects.

Last month, workers completed an $80,000 makeover on a Mesa house that had unsafe wiring and other issues, Harper said.

Stardust workers were busy this week emptying the Boyds' house of cabinets, a microwave and other items. The house is being demolished to make room for a 6,500-square-foot house.

Boyd, who has five children, said she understands the value of giving and has encouraged her daughters to donate clothes to secondhand stores.

A fundamental spiritual law says that if you give, you receive, she said.

"People will not know that unless they try," she said.

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