Intel's new 5G speed was shown off at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics

Intel’s new 5G speed was shown off at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics. One big feature of the new speed is much shorter lag time.

The East Valley is at the epicenter of 5G development as employees at Intel’s Chandler campus work toward advancing the next generation of wireless technology, which will power a lot more than just cellphones.

The name 5G refers to the fifth-generation wireless communication standard currently being tested and developed by a range of technology companies, including Intel, Qualcomm and Nokia. It is the successor to the 4G, or LTE, networks currently offered by companies like Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile.

“(5G) is going to be a pretty historical inflection point in the wireless industry,” said Dan Rodriguez, vice president in the Data Center Group and general manager of the group’s Communications Infrastructure Division at Intel Corporation.

In Chandler, Intel has teams focusing on uses that go beyond how 5G will affect your smartphone, including developing radio frequency technology for 5G modems and ways of bringing the flexibility and scalability of the cloud to 5G networks.

“4G is primarily a mobile broadband experience focused on delivering capacity and speed to devices over the network,” Rodriguez said.

He added that 5G will still accomplish those tasks while also offering the lower latency necessary to support machine-to-machine communications that could be used in the future to support smart cities, smart manufacturing and other connected infrastructure.

Latency, also called lag time, refers to the delay that occurs as data is transferred over the network.

“We are rebuilding network from ground up to reduce that latency and improve user experience,” he said.

That reduced latency, along with increased speeds and the ability to connect many devices at once, will support a range of new applications in everything from entertainment to autonomous vehicles.

“The (5G) apps support will be more sophisticated and data-intensive,” said Victor Benjamin, professor of information systems at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

For instance, 5G could allow autonomous vehicles to communicate with each other in real-world situations, which would require extremely low latency and could require the transfer of up to one gigabyte of data per second, according to Intel.

5G technologies also will support the advancement of smart cities by allowing billions of devices to connect a network for a variety of reasons, including monitoring and administering city infrastructure, allowing residents to access community alerts and traffic and environmental monitoring.

5G could have a significant effect on the way society consumes entertainment as well.

Intel has already tested out these uses in real-world situations like a concert in Shanghai’s Mercedes-Benz Arena. The company partnered with China Unicom, Nokia and Tencent Cloud to create an immersive experience in which attendees could stream HD video of the concert from four different camera channels in real time to their seats.

The technology allowed attendees with tickets far from the stage to have the same view as someone with front-row seats, Rodriguez said.

With the Edge Video Orchestration technology deployed at the concert “live video latency was cut from the typical 30 seconds for Internet video to 0.5 seconds,” according to an Intel report.

Intel, in partnership with South Korean communications company KT Corporation, also deployed its developing 5G technology at the Winter Olympics earlier this year to provide different ways for attendees to experience the games even if they were miles away from the actual competition.     

Beyond these new uses, typical mobile users also will notice the effects of the new technology when it begins to roll out over the next several years.

For mobile users, 5G could result in much greater speeds and lower latency.

Currently, most mobile network providers in the U.S. provide service over 4G networks – which have speeds that can technically max out at just over 1 gigabits per second, though typical real-world speeds are under 50 megabits per second.

5G networks could support speeds from 10 to 20 Gbps.

For comparison, it would take over seven minutes to download the average high-definition move using a 4G connection at 80 Mbps. A user with a 10 Gbps connection could download that same movie in seconds.

Benjamin said that 5G networks could also address network congestion issues that arise in dense population centers, such as cities that host baseball teams during spring training.

“Current areas that have network congestion likely won’t anymore with 5G,” he said.

He added that 5G will enable the development of more complex apps and mobile games because of its ability to handle large amounts of data.  

Because of these potential uses, the major telecommunication companies are racing to roll out their own 5G networks. AT&T and Verizon both plan to launch 5G services this year and T-Mobile and Sprint could do the same in 2019, according to PCMag.

The industry as a whole is targeting 2020 to make 5G broadly available, according to Intel.

In addition to changing how mobile devices and other connected products perform, 5G networks probably will look different than their predecessors.

Unlike 4G networks, which rely on large antenna towers that cover large distances, 5G likely will use a larger network of smaller cells that could be the size of a typical wireless router, according to PCMag.

In Chandler, Intel is working toward accommodating these new uses by working the flexibility and scalability of cloud computing into 5G network technologies. That would allow service providers to divert network resources to high-traffic areas throughout the day, such as a downtown core during the day and suburban residential centers at night.

“You basically want to be able to scale workloads and network functions to where you need them whenever you need them,” Rodriguez said.

That will result in a better experience for customers and help service providers better manage traffic and lower the total cost of ownership.

He added, “Right here in Chandler, we are innovating on driving that sort of scenario for networking.”

These advancements could carry some risk to privacy because the security built in to legacy systems like 4G may not account for new services provided by 5G, according to a report by Chinese global communications company Huawei.

As 5G networks integrate multiple aspects of life, from smart homes and cars to telemedicine and smart hospitals, communications providers and technology companies will need to prepare for an unprecedented volume of data traffic, according to the Huawei report.

ASU’s Benjamin said there is not an inherent security flaw associated with 5G.

“Still, I think there is a security concern more in the sense that as we put more devices on 5G, we should be aware of the data that they are transmitting,” he said.

Benjamin pointed to smart speakers that are becoming more common in homes as an example, noting that the type of data collected by the device can vary by manufacturer.

He also said companies pioneering the technology will have to diligently work to address potential security vulnerabilities if the technology is going to be used in autonomous vehicles and other critical devices.

Rodriguez said Intel considers security one of its core guiding principles as it develops new technologies.

– Reach Wayne Schutsky at 480-898-6533 or wschutsky@timespublications.com.

The East Valley is at the epicenter of 5G development as employees at Intel’s Chandler campus work toward advancing the next generation of wireless technology, which will power a lot more than just cellphones.

The name 5G refers to the fifth-generation wireless communication standard currently being tested and developed by a range of technology companies, including Intel, Qualcomm and Nokia. It is the successor to the 4G, or LTE, networks currently offered by companies like Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile.

“(5G) is going to be a pretty historical inflection point in the wireless industry,” said Dan Rodriguez, vice president in the Data Center Group and general manager of the group’s Communications Infrastructure Division at Intel Corporation.

In Chandler, Intel has teams focusing on uses that go beyond how 5G will affect your smartphone, including developing radio frequency technology for 5G modems and ways of bringing the flexibility and scalability of the cloud to 5G networks.

“4G is primarily a mobile broadband experience focused on delivering capacity and speed to devices over the network,” Rodriguez said.

He added that 5G will still accomplish those tasks while also offering the lower latency necessary to support machine-to-machine communications that could be used in the future to support smart cities, smart manufacturing and other connected infrastructure.

Latency, also called lag time, refers to the delay that occurs as data is transferred over the network.

“We are rebuilding network from ground up to reduce that latency and improve user experience,” he said.

That reduced latency, along with increased speeds and the ability to connect many devices at once, will support a range of new applications in everything from entertainment to autonomous vehicles.

“The (5G) apps support will be more sophisticated and data-intensive,” said Victor Benjamin, professor of information systems at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

For instance, 5G could allow autonomous vehicles to communicate with each other in real-world situations, which would require extremely low latency and could require the transfer of up to one gigabyte of data per second, according to Intel.

5G technologies also will support the advancement of smart cities by allowing billions of devices to connect a network for a variety of reasons, including monitoring and administering city infrastructure, allowing residents to access community alerts and traffic and environmental monitoring.

5G could have a significant effect on the way society consumes entertainment as well.

Intel has already tested out these uses in real-world situations like a concert in Shanghai’s Mercedes-Benz Arena. The company partnered with China Unicom, Nokia and Tencent Cloud to create an immersive experience in which attendees could stream HD video of the concert from four different camera channels in real time to their seats.

The technology allowed attendees with tickets far from the stage to have the same view as someone with front-row seats, Rodriguez said.

With the Edge Video Orchestration technology deployed at the concert “live video latency was cut from the typical 30 seconds for Internet video to 0.5 seconds,” according to an Intel report.

Intel, in partnership with South Korean communications company KT Corporation, also deployed its developing 5G technology at the Winter Olympics earlier this year to provide different ways for attendees to experience the games even if they were miles away from the actual competition.     

Beyond these new uses, typical mobile users also will notice the effects of the new technology when it begins to roll out over the next several years.

For mobile users, 5G could result in much greater speeds and lower latency.

Currently, most mobile network providers in the U.S. provide service over 4G networks – which have speeds that can technically max out at just over 1 gigabits per second, though typical real-world speeds are under 50 megabits per second.

5G networks could support speeds from 10 to 20 Gbps.

For comparison, it would take over seven minutes to download the average high-definition move using a 4G connection at 80 Mbps. A user with a 10 Gbps connection could download that same movie in seconds.

Benjamin said that 5G networks could also address network congestion issues that arise in dense population centers, such as cities that host baseball teams during spring training.

“Current areas that have network congestion likely won’t anymore with 5G,” he said.

He added that 5G will enable the development of more complex apps and mobile games because of its ability to handle large amounts of data.  

Because of these potential uses, the major telecommunication companies are racing to roll out their own 5G networks. AT&T and Verizon both plan to launch 5G services this year and T-Mobile and Sprint could do the same in 2019, according to PCMag.

The industry as a whole is targeting 2020 to make 5G broadly available, according to Intel.

In addition to changing how mobile devices and other connected products perform, 5G networks probably will look different than their predecessors.

Unlike 4G networks, which rely on large antenna towers that cover large distances, 5G likely will use a larger network of smaller cells that could be the size of a typical wireless router, according to PCMag.

In Chandler, Intel is working toward accommodating these new uses by working the flexibility and scalability of cloud computing into 5G network technologies. That would allow service providers to divert network resources to high-traffic areas throughout the day, such as a downtown core during the day and suburban residential centers at night.

“You basically want to be able to scale workloads and network functions to where you need them whenever you need them,” Rodriguez said.

That will result in a better experience for customers and help service providers better manage traffic and lower the total cost of ownership.

He added, “Right here in Chandler, we are innovating on driving that sort of scenario for networking.”

These advancements could carry some risk to privacy because the security built in to legacy systems like 4G may not account for new services provided by 5G, according to a report by Chinese global communications company Huawei.

As 5G networks integrate multiple aspects of life, from smart homes and cars to telemedicine and smart hospitals, communications providers and technology companies will need to prepare for an unprecedented volume of data traffic, according to the Huawei report.

ASU’s Benjamin said there is not an inherent security flaw associated with 5G.

“Still, I think there is a security concern more in the sense that as we put more devices on 5G, we should be aware of the data that they are transmitting,” he said.

Benjamin pointed to smart speakers that are becoming more common in homes as an example, noting that the type of data collected by the device can vary by manufacturer.

He also said companies pioneering the technology will have to diligently work to address potential security vulnerabilities if the technology is going to be used in autonomous vehicles and other critical devices.

Rodriguez said Intel considers security one of its core guiding principles as it develops new technologies.

– Reach Wayne Schutsky at 480-898-6533 or wschutsky@timespublications.com.

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