Matching temperament types to children’s roles in the classroom - East Valley Tribune: Ahwatukee Foothills

Matching temperament types to children’s roles in the classroom

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Teresa Welsh

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Posted: Friday, July 22, 2011 6:00 pm | Updated: 3:42 pm, Sat Dec 22, 2012.

We are all getting ready for another school year and there are some things that we can do to make it easier for our children to adjust to going back to school.

As parents we need to know what type of temperaments our children have so we can educate their teachers. Some children have an aggressive temperament that can be challenging in a classroom. These kids are leaders and could be helpers in the classroom by giving them some responsibility, such as being a buddy to another child who is having difficulties.

A control temperament child needs to have choices and one of the choices is going to be the obvious choice. If a teacher or parent dictates to a child with a control temperament they will avoid being told what to do at all cost.

An anxiety temperament child is someone that worries about going to school and the daily events that are going to occur. A parent can prompt a child when they are leaving home. Many children can use visual aids to show the daily routine.

If you notice that your child is having some challenges, such as transitioning from one task to another, then you could suggest to the teacher to give he or she a prompt when things are going to change, like “10 minutes until we move to math and then five minutes to math.”

The other suggestion I have when children have transitional issues is to have pictures of their daily routine that they can visually see and get them ready to make the change.

Other kids have a hard time organizing themselves and need to have a student organizer. The teacher could on a daily basis check to see if he or she is writing their assignments down correctly.

Then each day the parent can sit down with their child to review what homework assignments they have to complete.

Some kids would benefit if they could sit in front of the classroom if they have a tendency to daydream or get distracted by kids talking. A teacher could keep an eye on them so if the child starts to daydream, just a touch on their desk can bring them back into the classroom.

These are just some of the things you can do to help your child adjust in their classroom. I always recommend a parent speak to their child’s teachers and give them some suggestions that would help the child have a great experience in their classroom.

No one knows your child better then you and it would make it easier for the teacher to help accommodate some of the challenges that your child might be having at the time.

Some of these occur because of maturity and others may be due to needs the child might be struggling with at the time.

• Teresa Welsh is the behavior coach to Independence Behavioral Coaching LLC, formed to help parents and teachers manage difficult behaviors in children. Reach her at (602) 531-0230 or twelsh@behavecoach.com.

 

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