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Posted: Tuesday, May 20, 2008 11:30 pm | Updated: 10:07 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

Bill to protect certain school subjects vetoed

Gov. Janet Napolitano vetoed legislation Tuesday that would have thrown an additional hurdle in the path of schools seeking to trim courses in arts, music, physical education and vocational education.

Bill to protect certain school subjects vetoed

Gov. Janet Napolitano vetoed legislation Tuesday that would have thrown an additional hurdle in the path of schools seeking to trim courses in arts, music, physical education and vocational education.

Rep. Mark Anderson, R-Mesa, said he is concerned that schools, facing new demands to teach more math and science, are opting to drop various nonacademic programs. He thinks that is a bad idea, saying there is evidence that students who enroll in these classes do better academically.

As originally crafted, Anderson’s bill would have barred schools from dropping those courses unless they could prove to the state Board of Education that they were suffering a financial emergency.

Facing opposition, he agreed to let the local boards drop the courses — but only after a public hearing.

Napolitano said that’s the way school boards already make decisions, calling his measure “both unnecessary and redundant.” Anderson, however, said that’s not how things are done now.

He said his legislation would make it clear that the board, while still free to cut the courses, would have to do it in public and potentially risk voter wrath.

Day laborer measure gets preliminary OK

The Senate gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a measure to expand the crime of trespass to include people standing on or near public streets looking for work.

Rep. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, acknowledged that his measure is aimed at day laborers, people who congregate near home improvement stores and business areas in hopes of getting hired for odd jobs.

But, he said, it does not specifically target illegal immigrants. He said HB2412 is a public safety measure, noting that people could be arrested only if they disrupt vehicle or pedestrian traffic while soliciting employment.

The measure, which has already been approved by the House, still needs a final roll-call vote before going to Gov. Janet Napolitano.

The governor has previously vetoed similar legislation but would not comment Tuesday about whether the new version is any more acceptable.

Measure allows some felons to carry weapon

The Senate gave preliminary approval Tuesday to allowing some people who have been convicted of felonies to get a state permit to carry a concealed weapon.

Arizona does not currently grant permits to those with felony convictions in any state.

HB2634 creates an exception if the conviction has been expunged, set aside or otherwise vacated, or if the person has had his civil rights restored and is allowed to carry a gun under federal law.

The House has already approved similar language.

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