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  • Medicare’s five star quality ratings

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rates the relative quality of the private plans that are offered to Medicare beneficiaries through the Medicare Advantage program. CMS rates Medicare Advantage plans on a one to five-star scale, the highest quality being five stars. This star rating provides an overall measure of the plan’s quality and is an indication of the quality of care, access to care, responsiveness, and beneficiary satisfaction provided by the Medicare Advantage plan. This means that the higher the star rating a plan receives, the more likely you are to receive the care you need, when and where you need it - and most of all, you are more likely to be satisfied with your plan.For each years’ star rating, CMS rates Medicare Advantage health plans based on 53 quality measures and 2 improvement measures. The information that is evaluated for the star rating comes from a comprehensive list of sources:◦ Customer surveys done by Medicare (you)◦ Information from clinicians (your doctors)◦ Information submitted by the Medicare Advantage plans◦ Results from Medicare's regular monitoring activities and

  • Williams Field grad among six killed in auto accident in Utah

    A former Williams Field High School diver was among six victims of a fiery, head-on collision that occurred during one of Utah's deadliest Fourth of July weekends in the past two decades, authorities said Monday.Queen Creek resident Cody Farabee was killed along with his pregnant fiancée, 23-year-old Rheana Hazel, died while driving to visit Farabee’s extended family in Moab, Utah. Also killed in the accident was 11-year-old Esmerelda Velasquez, of Salt Lake City, who was n a minivan that struck a sports car containing Farabee and Hazel while trying to pass another car, the Utah Highway Patrol said in a news release.Three others from the minivan died. They were Samantha Blueeyes, 23; Michael Blueeyes, 22; and Alfreda Bowman, 28, all from Salt Lake City.A seventh person, who was in the minivan, also is in very critical condition from Sunday's crash, Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Todd Royce said. He is Travis Howland, 24, of Salt Lake City.The wreck happened on U.S. Route 191 near Monticello, about 285 miles southeast of Salt Lake City. The sports car caught fire, killing both occupants at the scene. Five people were in the minivan, and three of them died at the scene. One other victim died later at the hospital.It came two days after another head-on collision involving a wrong-way driver on Interstate 80 in northern Utah killed three members of a family.

  • Mom of Mesa Sgt. Brandon Mendoza pens emotional letter on immigration to President Obama

    The mother of Brandon Mendoza, the Mesa police Sergeant who was hit and killed by a wrong-way driver in May, has penned an emotional letter to the President on immigration.In her letter addressed directly to President Barack Obama, Mary Ann Mendoza claims the federal government knew that Raul Silva Corona, the wrong-way driver, whose blood alcohol content was nearly three times the legal limit at the time of the crash, was in the country illegally.RELATED: Suspect in wrong-way crash had BAC 3-times the legal limitShe said prosecutors were "lenient" when Corona was convicted of crimes in Colorado.Court records show that Corona pleaded guilty to a 1994 criminal conspiracy charge in Adams County, Colorado, and prosecutors dismissed charges of burglary, assault and leaving an accident scene. His sentence and more details about the charges against him weren't available."When he was convicted of these crimes and 1994 and the government knew he was in the country illegally, why wasn't he deported? Why are any of these illegal criminals in this country ??," she said in her letter.

  • Dogs may have died at Green Acre Dog Boarding facility even with air conditioning

    Authorities said on Wednesday that even if the air conditioning was working in a room at a Gilbert boarding facility where nearly two dozen dogs died last month, the air flow may not have been enough to keep the dogs alive.Twelve Maricopa County Sheriff’s detectives went into the Green Acre Dog Boarding facility with two electrical and air flow forensic experts early in the morning with a search warrant and seized evidence from the business and the home on the property.They are hoping the evidence will help determine why 22 dogs died in the facility between June 19 and June 20 .According to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office, the dogs left by vacationing owners were said to have died from heat exposure.The business owners claim one of the dogs chewed through a wire which shorted out the air conditioning unit to the 9 by 12 foot room where 28 dogs were being kept, according to MCSO.Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was on hand as deputies seized computers, cell phones, ledgers and business documents, as well as wiring and drywall.

  • Valley Metro bus involved in Chandler collision

    Four people were on a Valley Metro bus when it collided with another vehicle in Chandler Wednesday morning.Chandler police spokesman Seth Tyler says the accident that occurred at Cooper Road and Chandler Boulevard was not serious.Air15 video showed a black sedan with front end damage in the intersection.The bus appeared to have run up off the roadway, over the sidewalk and into a landscaped area in front of a convenience store.So far there is no word on how the collision occurred or whether anyone was injured.

  • ASU professor pleads guilty to resisting arrest

    The ASU professor who made nationwide headlines after video showed her confrontation with Arizona State University police has plead guilty.Ersula Ore plead guilty in a downtown Phoenix courtroom on Wednesday morning.Ore's scheduling is set for August 1st at 8:30 a.m.ASU police say Ore was stopped for walking in the middle of a street near campus and refused to show officers any identification.They say Ore resisted arrest and kicked an officer in the shin after being handcuffed.Ore says she was walking in the street because construction work obstructed the sidewalk.

  • Diners, friends helping Chandler restaurateur through hard times

    For Randy Walters, the expression “when it rains, it pours” has become all too true in the past week.The Chandler restaurateur who owns Wimpy’s Paradise and the temporarily closed Pittsburgh Willy’s had his custom hot dog cart stolen last Friday, then a bank deposit bag full of money and a week’s worth of receipts disappeared after he accidently left it in the back of a taxi and, as if that wasn’t enough, Walters experienced some cardiac issues and had surgery to insert a stent on Tuesday, July 8.Before his hospitalization, Walters posted a plea for help on his Facebook page, asking customers and their friends to dine at Wimpy’s.“I need customers, lots of customers to help get through this perfect storm of bad luck I have had,” said Walters in the post.Some of Walters’ friends set up a GoFundMe webpage (www.gofundme.com/b3fxok) to raise funds and assuage some of his financial troubles.On Wednesday, Walters had a Facebook post saying he was resting at home, and he thanked the many patrons who dined at Wimpy’s this week for their “overwhelming response and support.”

  • House of Brews in Gilbert hosting five-course/brew meal

    House of Brews in Gilbert will have a dinner event featuring five different courses and five accompanying beers on July 15.House of Brews is working with Grand Canyon Brewery to put on the event, which features five dishes — Rocky Mountain oysters, clams casino, sweet breads, elk ossobucco and a secret fifth course — accompanied by five of the brewery’s beers.The dinner begins at 7 p.m. and the cost is $40 per person. House of Brews is located at 825 S. Cooper Road, and diners should call (480) 426-9787 to reserve a seat.

  • If you enjoy live country music five nights a week, Bourbon Jacks in Chandler is the place for you.[Vincent Cota/East Valley Tribune]

    Video: Live Country Music at Bourbon Jacks in Chandler

    If you enjoy live country music five nights a week, Bourbon Jacks in Chandler is the place for you.[Vincent Cota/East Valley Tribune]

  • Ten things to do this weekend ... and beyond

    Boz ScaggsThe Grammy Award-winning artist will perform classics like “Look What You’ve Done To Me,” “We’re All Alone” and “Lido Shuffle” during a 21-and-older performance fusing rock, jazz, blues and R&B.DETAILS >> 8 p.m. Thursday, July 10. Talking Stick Resort, 9800 E. Indian Bend Road, Scottsdale. $60-$125. (480) 850-7777 or TalkingStickResort.com/boz-scaggs.aspx.Comic-themed Family Fun DayChildren and their families can enjoy a variety of art-making projects, educational booths and performances in conjunction with the summer exhibition Funny Papers, an exploration of the history of comic strips and their prevalence as art. Activities include face painting, dance and magic shows from Persephone, C3 Dance and Jolly Roger, and stations for making cartoon critters, superhero capes, shields and paper hats.DETAILS >> 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 12. ASU Art Museum, 10th Street and Mill Avenue in Tempe. Free. (480) 965-2787 or ASUArtMuseum.asu.edu.

  • Photos: Tempe Town Lake

  • Worth the Trip: Medieval Mayhem, Greer stories & a Jesuit mission campout

    GREERCentennial Good Old Days Story Telling TimeA trip to this verdant mountain hamlet is welcome any summer weekend, but time your next visit to this gathering, held at the 1914 Butterfly Lodge Museum, and you’ll gain a whole new perspective on the getaway destination you’ve been visiting for years.Longtime Greer locals will share lore about the community, once a friendly frontier outpost where the likes of President Teddy Roosevelt, Western novelist Mary Roberts Rinehart and Hollywood legend John Wayne would visit the state’s oldest lodge, the Molly Butler. Perched atop a knoll near a spring that trickles into the Little Colorado River, the museum itself — site of the storytelling — played a big role in the life of writer James Willard Schultz (1859–1947) and his artist son, Lone Wolf. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it houses original period furnishings and artifacts.DETAILS >> 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 12. Butterly Lodge Museum, at the southeast corner of State Route 373 and County Road 1126. Museum admission is $1-$2 per person; programs, like this one, are often free. (928) 735-7514 or ButterflyLodgeMuseum.org.PINETOP-LAKESIDE

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • Medicare’s five star quality ratings

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rates the relative quality of the private plans that are offered to Medicare beneficiaries through the Medicare Advantage program. CMS rates Medicare Advantage plans on a one to five-star scale, the highest quality being five stars. This star rating provides an overall measure of the plan’s quality and is an indication of the quality of care, access to care, responsiveness, and beneficiary satisfaction provided by the Medicare Advantage plan. This means that the higher the star rating a plan receives, the more likely you are to receive the care you need, when and where you need it - and most of all, you are more likely to be satisfied with your plan.For each years’ star rating, CMS rates Medicare Advantage health plans based on 53 quality measures and 2 improvement measures. The information that is evaluated for the star rating comes from a comprehensive list of sources:◦ Customer surveys done by Medicare (you)◦ Information from clinicians (your doctors)◦ Information submitted by the Medicare Advantage plans◦ Results from Medicare's regular monitoring activities and

  • House of Brews in Gilbert hosting five-course/brew meal

    House of Brews in Gilbert will have a dinner event featuring five different courses and five accompanying beers on July 15.House of Brews is working with Grand Canyon Brewery to put on the event, which features five dishes — Rocky Mountain oysters, clams casino, sweet breads, elk ossobucco and a secret fifth course — accompanied by five of the brewery’s beers.The dinner begins at 7 p.m. and the cost is $40 per person. House of Brews is located at 825 S. Cooper Road, and diners should call (480) 426-9787 to reserve a seat.

  • Chandler Corporate Center sells for almost $14 million

    Chandler Corporate Center I sold for $13.914 Million, breaking the $200-per-square-foot mark for office space.The sale of the 67,561 square-foot space located at 585 N. Juniper Drive, Chandler, was completed by capital markets experts in the Phoenix branch of Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL). JLL will hold the property’s leasing assignment and assume the role of property management.

  • Chandler real estate agents receive professional honor

    Three Chandler real estate agents have received special recognition.RE/MAX agents Deena Harris, Lisa Whyte and Mike Widmer were named to the Young Professional Networks (YPN) 2014 40 under 40 list for their efforts in the community. YPN is a program of the SouthEast Valley Regional Association of Realtors that looks to help real estate professionals in their careers become involved in their communities.

  • Chandler man buys gun belonging to legendary lawman Wyatt Earp

    Chandler resident John Anderson has always had an appreciation for the Old West. It stems from his relation to a Los Angeles policeman named James Woodard, who happened to be friends with famous Western lawman Wyatt Earp.“When you’re growing up you hear about the O.K. Corral and the famous gunfight and the lawmen of the early West,” Anderson said. “It was pretty interesting; I was always attracted to that kind of story.“So, growing up and knowing that I had a relative that hung out with this guy was really cool.”Anderson has a collection of more than 1,500 firearms locked away in a vault equipped with all kinds of lasers and sensors capable of giving Fort Knox a run for its money.Two of the guns on their own may not strike anyone as overly impressive: a Winchester lever-action shotgun and a Remington cap-and-ball revolver. What makes them impressive, however, is their respective former owners — the shotgun belonged to Earp, while the revolver belonged to Earp’s father, Nicholas Porter Earp.Anderson bought the guns and a collection of documents — 18 crates worth to be exact — from the estate of Glenn Boyer, a famous Wyatt Earp historian and author, from an auction at J. Levine Auction & Appraisal in Scottsdale in April.

  • Let Joe Know: Be wary of home warranties

    You can buy a warranty or an extended warranty on just about everything these days.I usually advise against most of them because I see so many exclusions and warranty companies routinely denying claims. That’s what happened to Felice Weiner.“The house wouldn’t cool off,” she told me.It’s over 100 degrees outside and inside it wasn’t much cooler, but Felice had a home warranty. It was Sensible Home Warranty and she called them. And she called and called.“I was calling almost daily hoping they’d get tired of me,” Felice says.That’s because Felice says Sensible was acting not so sensible.

Pets Food Health TV Travel

  • Engineering for Kids Summer Camp

    Engineering for Kids offering STEM Based Summer Camps at Primavera in Chandler. Announces Summer Camp Open House on May 17thWhat is East Valley Engineering for Kids?Engineering for Kids is an enrichment program that teaches concepts on a variety of engineering fields in classes and camps for kids’ ages 4-14. We want to spark an interest in the kids for science, technology and engineering. The camps are all themes based and require the kids to work in teams to address engineering challenges and problems. All programs meet national education standards for STEM and align with Common Core for math and science. Engineering for Kids has operated since 2009, is in 26 states and 4 countries. When and what is the open house for?The open house on May 17th is an opportunity for parents to come and see the facility, meet the staff from Engineering for Kids, and get their questions answered. The summer camps will be offered at Primavera Blended Learning Center at 2451 N. Arizona Avenue in Chandler. The open house is from 11 am to 3 pm.  From 1-2 pm we’re having our popular robotics workshop where the kids will build, program, test and improve the robots. At the end of the workshop, the kids will compete against each other in a Sumo Bot tournament. An RSVP is highly recommended as seating is limited. Please email your RSVP to eastvalley@engineeringforkids.net. What is Primavera Blended Learning Center?

  • Keeping the Faith: You Will Be Blessed

    I’ve made a habit lately of studying the Amish. I use the word “study” loosely as this is not a simple curiosity of mine or some kind of theological experiment. My exploration flows out of a deep respect and admiration for their faith and spirituality. We English (that’s what the Amish call us outside their communities) recognize them because of their familiar beards, horse-drawn buggies, fine woodworking, or barn-raisings, but there’s a lot more to this group than sturdy furniture and firm dispositions. They have a lively, vibrant faith despite their archaic lifestyles.The Amish (and their cousins the Mennonites, Brethren, and a few other groups) I have come to know are lovers and active makers of peace. They value simplicity above almost any other thing. They love their families and community, and they have a profound trust in God. This trust, employing a good Amish-German word, is called “Gelassenheit.”“Gelassenheit” is usually translated into English as “submission,” "yield," or "serenity," but it is so much more. It is a total letting go of entanglements. It is a relinquishment of the self. It is an exchange of human, personal will for a “thy will be done” kind of life — not a blind, hopeless fatalism, but a defiant and restful faith in God. One Amish farmer summed up “Gelassenheit” like this: “We don’t pray for rain,” he said. “But we are thankful to God when the rain arrives.” This perspective gives the Amish a completely different understanding of “the will of God” than most of the Christian universe.Many of us have been taught, tacitly or overtly, that “God’s will” is this magic be-all-end-all, which, if discovered, can end all the angst and indecision of life. So we chase after and fret over what God wants us to do, thinking there will be complete and total disaster if we miss the secret plan he has for us. We twist and writhe in the anguish of our decisions, never feeling good about any choice we make.Finally, we conjure up all the bravado or foolishness we can muster, smile through gritted teeth, and give a direction a whirl. If it all works out, we praise God for his magnificent direction. If it is a belly-flopping disaster we scratch our heads, feel terribly ashamed, and blame God or our weak faith for leading us the wrong way.The truth is, most Christians really want to do what God wants us to do; we want to do “the will of God.” Equally as true, however, is this: There is no exact formula for finding this will. This does not sound very spiritual, but in my experience, finding God’s will is as much about trial and error as it is about praying and seeking. And yes, sometimes it ends in a big mess. Maybe we can take a cue from the Amish and neutralize the mystery of finding and doing God’s will. Maybe we can learn to simply trust God with our life and our circumstances. Maybe, if we keep hitting the wall, we can stop, listen, and trust for a while. Maybe we can learn to yield our own wills, or at least stop using God’s name to sanction our decisions.

  • Jernigan: A proper response to darkness

    Light serves a profound function in our lives. Receive too much or too little of it and you’ll experience both physical and emotional effects. I remember visiting Alaska in the summer and reading a book by sunlight at two in the morning. This was a pretty cool experience but it made it quite difficult to sleep at my normal times. I also have many friends who live in Seattle and talk about the lack of sunlight they receive on a regular basis. It’s not uncommon for a person to choose where she lives based on the light available in that state. Light affects everything.It shouldn’t surprise us then that light serves as an important metaphor for spirituality. The apostle John heard Jesus explain firsthand that He Himself was the light of the world (John 8:12, 9:5). After years of reflecting on this, John would later teach us that “God is light; in him there is no darkness at all. If we claim to have fellowship with him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not live out the truth” (1 John 1:5a-6).But how is a Christian to live out the truth without walking in darkness? This question has caused many good-intentioned believers to make a costly error. This all too common but tragic mistake is that many Christians attempt to run from the darkness. At first glance, it might make sense. Run toward the light and away from anything else. This causes some Christians to alienate themselves from the world around them and is surprisingly easy to do today. We can listen to Christian music, watch Christian TV shows and movies, read Christian books and blogs, and hang out with Christian friends and neighbors. Essentially, we can pretend like the dark world around us doesn’t exist. While none of these actions by themselves are an issue, the inclusion of them at the exclusion of anything else is definitely an issue. Sadly, many Christians live this way today and defend it as the truly spiritual way to live.But this isn’t what John is explaining in this passage. Following Jesus doesn’t remove the darkness around you as any seasoned Christian can attest. All your prayers aren’t suddenly answered and your problems erased. There will continue to be darkness around us until Jesus redeems all things. Instead, the light changes the way you view the darkness around you. A more accurate way of looking at it would be to consider whether your eyes are accustomed to the light or to the darkness. In physical terms we all know that our eyes will settle for one of the two and will take time to go back and forth. Jesus invites us to retrain our eyes to the light.Specifically, having the light of Christ means we no longer live in fear of the darkness. It has no hold over us. As a result, we are able to show people that God is at work in areas that to them appear only dark. Our eyes are tuned to something greater. But it means we must willingly enter into the darkness in order to shine. It means we choose to put ourselves in sometimes uncomfortable situations. We would do well to take a cue from the social behaviors of Jesus and choose to surround ourselves with people currently far from a Christian lifestyle.This doesn’t mean we suddenly become like the darkness anymore than a dark room extinguishes a flashlight. We will always look different. But we will be there. And the light has nothing to fear from the darkness. The only way the darkness remains is if the people with the light run the other way. It’s time for Christians to stop running.

  • Keeping the Faith: A Garden in the Wilderness

    More than a decade ago, former Chief Justice Roy Moore of the Alabama Supreme Court installed a massive granite monument inscribed with the Ten Commandments in the rotunda of the Alabama State Judicial Building. Two years later it was removed by court order as a violation of the separation of church and state. Shortly thereafter, Justice Moore was also removed by court order from the Alabama State Judicial Building.Not long after these events played themselves out across our cable television news shows, Roy Moore’s Ten Commandments monument went on tour. Loaded onto the flatbed of a heavy-duty truck, it went town to town so onlookers could see for themselves this controversial work of stonemasonry.I watched the monument make its first stop in Dayton, Tennessee. This was a calculated move for the organizers of the tour. Dayton was home of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, where many feel Christian America was first besieged.An atheist was there in Dayton (or “Monkey Town” as it’s called) at that first stop, protesting the monument being placed on display. This man barely escaped with his life. Moore’s supporters, about a hundred I guess, were screaming out for the death of this single protestor.“Shoot him…hang him … put him before a firing squad!” These were all yelled from the crowd. One man speaking of the “godless” protestor said, “I’m glad I didn’t bring my gun. I’d be in jail right now.”The shady and twisted irony was not lost on me. Here were ardent supporters of the Ten Commandments — they had come out on a rainy day to see a stone rendering of them — wishing to violate those commandments as they called for the killing their enemy.

  • Take Me Home: Jordan

    Jordan is an adorable 8-year-old Jack Russell terrier who wins the hearts of everyone he comes in contact with, humans and canines alike! He’s one of the happiest and sweetest Jack Russell terriers we’ve ever met. This friendly, loving little guy will solicit pets from anyone who is passing by. Jordan likes to be held and enjoys warming laps; add belly rubs to the mix and you will have one happy dog on your hands! Don’t let Jordan’s age fool you — this guy is active and full of life! He loves to play and if it involves tennis balls, he will play fetch for hours! Jordan loves being outside; he’ll stand facing the sun with the wind in his face and I swear you can see him smiling! Jordan and his canine foster brother enjoy patrolling the backyard several times a day. Walks are huge on his list which isn’t a problem because he has impeccable leash manners and does great during car rides.Even when he takes an occasional, unintentional dip in the pool, Jordan is unfazed — he’ll simply swim to the steps and climb out! Jordan is quite the explorer and will look in every nook and cranny, including open closets and open cabinets. When Jordan gets sleepy, chances are he’ll fall fast asleep near you or in a cozy dog bed. You’d never know Jordan is deaf and probably has been for a long time, it doesn’t stop him from enjoying each day to the fullest.Our smart guy is doing great learning sign language — he’s already mastered sit, down, and will come in from outside when you flick a light on and off. He is also house trained. Jordan is a joy to be around and will make each day your best day ever. Jordan is the perfect package — a fun, affectionate, easygoing dog with a big personality. Everyone that meets him falls in love with him, so whoever adopts this boy is going to hit the jackpot! If interested in learning more about Jordan, please fill out an application for her today at www.azrescue.org.

  • Keeping the Faith: Disappearing dump trucks

    I once approached my life and work as if I was building a house. Drive a nail here. Lay a block there. Smear a bit of paint in the corner. Cut out a window now and again. Figuratively, this is how I treated my life, and it is a solid, powerful image. It is also an image with plenty of biblical roots.None other than Jesus himself said in the Sermon on the Mount, “Anyone who listens to my teaching and follows it is wise, like a person who builds a house on solid rock.” Of course those who ignore his teaching, Jesus said, are like those who build their lives on a sandy foundation with collapse all but imminent.Paul stuck with the theme as well, and he spoke of the possibility that our lives can be soundly constructed from things that will last like bricks and mortar — gold, silver, and precious jewels he called them. Or, Paul says, we can foolishly build with the combustible and momentary materials of wood, hay, or straw.It all reminds me of the story of the Three Little Pigs and the Big Bad Wolf: Some things are built to last. Other things blow away about as quickly as they were created, in spite of our brave squeals and the hair of our chinny, chin, chins.I haven’t given up on this building metaphor completely, but recently I did adopt a new narrative. It’s not about construction, but deconstruction. Last year I visited a housing project in San Salvador that is home to more than a thousand people. With homes, churches, markets, and a school, it is a safe and healthy neighborhood, thus far insulated from so much of the gang violence, extortion, and troubles of the city. It is no utopia, but it is a shining light within a very dangerous section of the city.The land upon which this neighborhood sits was given to a group of US American volunteers by the city of San Salvador because the city had basically given up on it. It was nothing but a forsaken junkyard, filled with crushed cars, old buses, dilapidated construction equipment, and families: People were living in the junkyard because they had no place else to go.

Video: Live Country Music at Bourbon Jacks in Chandler

If you enjoy live country music five nights a week, Bourbon Jacks in Chandler is the place for...

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