East Valley Tribune

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  • Gilbert woman uses wedding gowns to make clothes for deceased infants

    Karen Gillian is not a maid of honor that has bridesmaid dresses from 27 different weddings like in the 2008 film “27 Dresses.” Rather, the wedding dresses she has in her Gilbert home have a story to tell and have a special purpose: They are made into unique gowns for “angels” in heaven.Angel gowns are handmade garments made from donated wedding dresses that families can dress their baby in at a hospital after they have passed away. Gillian described the purpose of “Angel Gowns by Karen” as giving a beautiful and comfortable gown to a family who loses a child to swaddle their baby in when they are to be buried or to keep the gown as a special keepsake.Gillian said that most of the time when a premature baby dies in the hospital they are wrapped in a towel or washcloth.“Unless they are older, there really isn’t that much made for premature babies,” Gillian said. “Even preemie size (clothing) is way too big for some that are born at 26 weeks or younger. And because their skin is so delicate, you can’t put harsh materials on them otherwise it tears their skin.“So I serge the edges of my seams with the goal of making the gowns as soft as possible and as easy to put on; so I make them like a hospital gown with an opening in the back.”What goes into an angel gown

  • Local Jewish preschool follows Reggio Emilia Approach

    The Reggio Approach, viewing children as competent and capable humans, full of potential, is an approach that goes hand in hand with Judaism, according to leaders at the Chandler Jewish Preschool, and that’s why it was selected to govern the thinking at the preschool when it opened just over a year ago.“When you go talk to someone in childhood education they say things like, ‘Children are our future, we give them the skills to grow and be in the real world,’” said Shternie Deitsch, director of the preschool. “Our take is a little different. Our take is the kids matter the way they are now. They are full people with intelligence, ideas, emotions and they are important as they are now. We view the kids as little explorers and researchers and we try to make the environment such that invites them to explore and learn on their own.”Deitsch said the Reggio Emilia Approach, based on ideas from Loris Malaguzzi in Northern Italy, fit perfectly with ideas that were instilled in her growing up Jewish in Boston, where her Rabbi would take time out of his day several times a year to meet with just the children. Instructors at the school are asked to present an idea to a child and allow them to take the learning from there. The kids are encouraged to ask questions and come up with their own answers by investigating and thinking critically.The preschool is clearly different from traditional preschools, for several reasons, the moment you enter the classroom. There are no overwhelming colorful cartoon letters or numbers — the décor is all natural and much of it is homemade. Alongside the traditional alphabet, there’s also a Hebrew alphabet. This time of year there are no Christmas trees, snowflakes or Santa Claus on the wall, but there is a menorah on the table, handmade menorahs in one area and dreidels in a basket on the floor.“The kids participate in creating the environment,” said Tara Leafman, one of the instructors at the school. “Our A, B, C’s and 1, 2, 3’s the kids colored the paper and we created the experience for them. They are very connected to the classroom itself.”While there are no specific religious lessons, the traditions and ideals of Judaism are seamlessly woven in daily in the classroom.

  • EnVie in Chandler offers healthy experience for women

    Gary Findley has had a lot of success since he got his start in the fitness industry at the age of 19. He is the former president of the women’s fitness mega-chain Curves. As the president of Curves for eight years, he saw the company grow to 8,000 locations.But Findley needed a new challenge, something different to take on.So, in March of this year, he came on as the COO of EnVie Fitness.“What I really enjoyed was the development part,” Findley said. “The development part I thought we had kind of met all of that (with Curves). For me I just felt like it was time, number one.“Number two, I felt like the model was not changing, the Curves model, so most of all I just felt like it was time for me to move on.”EnVie got its start in 2012 in Australia and made its move to the U.S. this past summer, opening a location in Dallas. The Chandler location, which has only been open for a few months, is the second location to be opened in the states.

  • Hamilton trying to get back to title game, but will have plenty of challenges on the way

    When it comes to boys soccer, the East Valley is loaded in Division I, while Division II and III look to catch up and represent the Valley in the playoffs.Last year, eight East Valley high schools qualified for the Division I playoffs while only two teams from the East Valley qualified for the division II or III tournament. Here’s a look at how the divisions shake out.Division IAt the highest division, Hamilton appears to be the team to beat once again. After snagging the No. 1 seed in last year’s playoffs, the Huskies made a run all the way to the state title game before falling to Brophy 1-0.Although coach Nick Markette says his team isn’t necessarily playing with a chip on its shoulder, the players are using last year’s championship defeat as motivation.“It provides fuel. It provides a sense of urgency,” he said. “In our vision we should have won it and our vision we play every year to win it so it certainly provides a level of cognitive dissonance if you will to put in that sense of urgency to continue to work and progress.”

  • Councilmember Hartke named ‘Outstanding Volunteer’ by Chandler Unified School District

    One day it was hats, another day a giant inflatable whale, after that it was rocks. Chandler Councilmember Kevin Hartke is always bringing in something interesting for Maria Acosta’s sixth-grade class at Galveston Elementary.Hartke would come in and read books to the class as a part of the “Book Pals” program. He also came in and helped students learn to read. Now, for his efforts, Hartke was named an “Outstanding Volunteer” by the Chandler Unified School District at the district’s annual Night of Recognition on Dec. 3.The items Hartke, who has been reading to students at Galveston for the last eight years, brings in relates to the books he’s reading to the class, and the students love it.“I don’t even say anything,” Acosta said. “When he walks in the door the kids automatically get him a chair up at the front of the room and they come and they sit right in front of him. And they’re all close by him and they’re ready and willing to see what he has to say.”Hartke’s commitment to improving the lives of young people prompted Acosta to nominate Hartke for the recognition.“His dedication, his enthusiasm when he walks into the classroom when he’s with the students, just volunteering his time, he was just a natural candidate to nominate,” Acosta said.

  • Choir in Gilbert emphasizes love of music, discipline in young performers

    Sticky cheeks, dirty hands, and smiling faces.More than 90 children, ages 4 to 7, come to choir practice to learn about the power that can come when performing music.The conductor, Brandon Stewart, said he focuses on classical and religious music, and although young, these children are expected at practice each Thursday at American Leadership Academy in Gilbert.Stewart wants the kids to “feel the spirit and power of this great music.”The group’s choirs have performed “Oh! Susanna” and “Battle Hymn of the Republic” in the past. In their December concert some of the songs the youngest group will perform are “The Nativity” and “Little Snowflake,” celebrating the holiday season.Being a member of a performing choir “gets into their blood stream” and makes them feel part of something bigger, Stewart said.

  • Bands announced for McDowell Mountain Music Festival

    The three-day festival at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix, March 27-29, 2015, will feature Widespread Panic, Passion Pit, Thievery Corporation, Phantogram, Portugal, The Man, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Beats Antique, Trampled by Turtles, StrFkr, Robert Delong, and Break Science.Tickets are now on sale at MMMF.com. After hours event passes will be on sale at a later date.John Largay, President of Wespac Construction, which has produced the non-profit music festival since 2004, said in a release, “This festival is a party for the people. It’s a community effort, engaging music enthusiasts to come out to enjoy an eclectic mix of talents and also to support notable charities in the Valley.”Proceeds from the festival benefit Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation and UMOM New Day Center, which provides homeless families and individuals with safe shelter, housing and supportive services.

  • King Washington: Creating a new American sound

    Finishing up a 10-week tour across the country, King Washington landed at Rogue Bar in Scottsdale on Dec. 9. The Los Angeles-based band has been hard at work garnishing fans, press, and turning out a sound that stands out against the rest.Many bands today claim to be inspired by past greats like Queen or the Beatles, but King Washington successfully fuses the sounds of the '60s and '70s with contemporary indie-rock flavor. But rehash it is not -- their sound is fresh and wholly their own.They opened their set at the Rouge with a bluesy number that made you sit up and listen, progressing into a juicy rock set with "Don’t Expect My Love" -- a toe-tapper reminiscent of Kiss and Led Zeppelin.Shifting down to a softer sound with "Animal," they combined dreamy guitar rifts that evoked lazy summer days at the beach with delicious harmonies that we could listen to for days. If Peter, Paul, and Mary had ever decided to become a rock band they could have taken notes from King Washington, who also mixes in hints of Santana and Cake, breathing new life into the classic SoCal sound.The trick for any new band is to create their own sound, and King Washington has done that. Their fusion of rock, folk, indie, blues and pop is so effortless that they can be easily credited with creating a “new” American sound.That could be due in part to their lineage, which runs with music greatness. Guitarist and vocalist Tyson Kelly is the son of songwriting Hall of Famer Tom Kelly ("True Colors," "I'll Stand by You" and "Like a Virgin").

  • Give memories as gifts with these local experiences

    Still racking your brain for gifts? Forgo another trip to the mall or evening spent scouring Amazon.com, and look to one of these local experiences instead. They’ll leave less mess under the tree and a memory that will last a lot longer than that “Guardians of the Galaxy” Blu-Ray sitting in your cart.ONE-OF-A-KIND PHOTO SESSIONArtist David Emitt Adams will create tintype portraits for locals through Dec. 14 at Art Intersection, on the second floor of the Heritage Court Building in downtown Gilbert. Sitting for the handcrafted portrait, made using a historic process originally invented in the 1850s, takes a few minutes; within 45 minutes, you leave with a one-of-a-kind, 4-by-5-inch work of art that Grandma will cherish.Portraits are $90. Additional images are $25-$45. Call for an appointment at (480) 361-1118.BEER TOURFather-son duo John “Hoppymoto” and Johnny “Boi” Alvarado, of Arizona Brewery Tours offer shuttles to Valley craft breweries beyond the big local beer names everyone knows by heart. “HOP’on” tours ($99 per person), offered Wednesdays through Saturdays, include a meal and stops at three breweries over four to five hours. You’ll learn about types of beer and the brewing process, get behind-the-scenes tours, and sample 15-18 different suds along the way.

  • 3 questions on The West Select

    The West kisses one cheek like an old friend and the other as a beguiling stranger in The West Select: A Western Art Invitational Sale and Exhibition at Phoenix Art Museum. A Men’s Arts Council fundraiser for the museum, it’s also a gallery show full of high-caliber art worth seeing, whether you’re whiling away a winter afternoon or occupying out-of-towners.The more than 100 new works of art provide “a diverse look at art of the American West that touches on all the reasons we love the West, from the iconic, almost mythical images of cowboys to images of the New West,” says Jerry Smith, Ph.D., the museum’s curator of American and Western American art.Thirty-seven artists are represented in the show, including Scott Baxter, whose arresting black-and-white photographs of “Arizona Ranchers” you may have noticed hanging in Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (and who took this year’s West Select Best in Show award), and Ed Mell, whose cubist interpretation of Sedona’s Cathedral Rock graced the U.S. Postal Service’s Arizona Centennial postage stamp in 2012.Here Smith shares more about the exhibition that captures both familiar and unexpected elements of the region we call home.Q: Is the West still distinguishable from other areas of the country?A: There is a lot of sameness throughout the country and even the world anymore. You go to Russia and can order Pizza Hut. But one of the things that’s very distinctive about the American West is that we still maintain a lot of open land. If you see nighttime photos from space, where you see how bright the country is at night east of the Mississippi and how much more dispersed city lights are west of the Mississippi, you recognize there is a distinction. That openness of space plays out a lot in the art, and addresses larger issues of freedom, liberty, the ability to be your own person. And those ideas still ring true in the West.

  • Charlie Daniels Band comes down to Phoenix

    Legendary country artist and Southern rocker Charlie Daniels is coming to the historic Celebrity Theatre on Dec. 11 for a special holiday classic show featuring new and old musical favorites.Daniels, a Grand Ole Opry member, spoke with GetOut about his latest release and return to Phoenix.Q: Your new album “Off the Grid – Doin’ It Dylan” pays tribute to Bob Dylan. What inspired this move?CD: I’ve always been a big Bob Dylan fan. I did three albums with him as a studio musician and finally got around to making this tribute. He was one of the very first innovators who started changing things in rock ’n’ roll, even before the Beatles or the Rolling Stones. He changed the face of popular music today.We wanted to choose songs that fit our style and there were endless opportunities. Tunes like “The Times They Are a Changin” and “Country Pie” worked with what we were trying to do musically.Q: How does having your own recording studio impact your song-writing process?

  • Cocktail of the month: All That Glitters Eggnog Martini

    In the spirit of Christmas, this month’s cocktail from Kelly’s at SouthBridge combines charity with cheer. The drink, a blend of homemade eggnog, rum and Tuaca liqueur, garnished with edible gold, is available until Dec. 31 and costs $25 — which is pricey, but 100 percent of the proceeds go to Andrea’s Closet, a nonprofit organization that provides toys for hospitalized children. Of course, if you’ve already made your Christmas donations or don’t feel like driving to Scottsdale, you can mix up the drink at home with the following ingredients.Ingredients4 oz. homemade eggnog1.5 oz. Bacardi 8 RumSplash TuacaGarnish: Sugar/gold flake rim, grated nutmeg

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  • Gilbert woman uses wedding gowns to make clothes for deceased infants

    Karen Gillian is not a maid of honor that has bridesmaid dresses from 27 different weddings like in the 2008 film “27 Dresses.” Rather, the wedding dresses she has in her Gilbert home have a story to tell and have a special purpose: They are made into unique gowns for “angels” in heaven.Angel gowns are handmade garments made from donated wedding dresses that families can dress their baby in at a hospital after they have passed away. Gillian described the purpose of “Angel Gowns by Karen” as giving a beautiful and comfortable gown to a family who loses a child to swaddle their baby in when they are to be buried or to keep the gown as a special keepsake.Gillian said that most of the time when a premature baby dies in the hospital they are wrapped in a towel or washcloth.“Unless they are older, there really isn’t that much made for premature babies,” Gillian said. “Even preemie size (clothing) is way too big for some that are born at 26 weeks or younger. And because their skin is so delicate, you can’t put harsh materials on them otherwise it tears their skin.“So I serge the edges of my seams with the goal of making the gowns as soft as possible and as easy to put on; so I make them like a hospital gown with an opening in the back.”What goes into an angel gown

  • Businesses buckling down for end of light rail construction

    Mesa TV & Appliance salesman Brian Richardson has a problem: His customers can’t turn left into his driveway.Light rail construction has divided Main Street into two one-way streets, and Richardson said it’s making business “horrible.”“When a customer is travelling eastbound looking for appliances, they cannot make a left-hand turn onto my driveway here,” he said. “So what they’ll do — they’ll continue on and then make a right turn and go to my competition.”A tough stretchMesa TV & Appliance is not the only store off Main Street hurting because of the light rail construction, which is anticipated to finish in spring 2015. The extension will add stations to Alma School Road, Country Club Drive, Center Street and Mesa Drive.Crew members hammer and weld, and cement trucks surround the unfinished tracks with a load to pour. Long lines of cars stream through the one-way roads. The intersection on Country Club Drive and Main is sometimes closed on the weekends, making things worse, Richardson said.

  • IRS Mileage rates to change Jan. 1

    The IRS’ optional standard mileage rates will see a few changes effective Jan. 1.The amount for business miles driven will increase to 57.5 cents per mile starting on the first day of the year. Additionally, miles driven for medical or moving purposes will decrease to 23 cents per mile and driving for charitable organizations will be 14 cents.

  • East Valley has cheapest gas in Arizona

    Drivers across Arizona, including the East Valley, continue to feel the benefits of the recent decline in fuel prices.AAA Arizona reports the average pump price in the state dropped by more than 10 cents this week to $2.555 a gallon. The East Valley jumped over Peoria to sport the lowest average in Arizona at $2.436, while Flagstaff has the highest fuel costs at $2.877.The national average is down by just shy of 11 cents to $2.621.

  • Chandler Chamber hosting fashion show

    A Chandler Chamber of Commerce event for women in business on Dec. 16 will feature speed networking and a fashion show.The inaugural Chandler Chamber Women in Business Holiday Luncheon and Fashion Show will start at 10:30 a.m. with an opportunity for vendors to engage with one another. The fashion show and lunch will begin at noon. The cost is $25 for chamber members and $35 for non-members.The event is located at SoHo63, located at 63 E. Boston St. More information can be found by emailing WIB@chandlerchamber.com.

  • AlphaGraphics Chandler-Gilbert opens charity contest

    AlphaGraphics Chandler-Gilbert has started a contest to help out area nonprofit groups advertise their services better.The company’s Increase Your Reach Awards will give local 501 (c) (3) organizations a chance to win services from AlphaGraphics from between $500 and $2,000. Services include graphic design, printed marketing material, format signage and other services.Applications are accepted until Dec. 31, and the company will announce the four winners on Jan. 31. Visit alphagraphics.com to learn more.

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  • Local Jewish preschool follows Reggio Emilia Approach

    The Reggio Approach, viewing children as competent and capable humans, full of potential, is an approach that goes hand in hand with Judaism, according to leaders at the Chandler Jewish Preschool, and that’s why it was selected to govern the thinking at the preschool when it opened just over a year ago.“When you go talk to someone in childhood education they say things like, ‘Children are our future, we give them the skills to grow and be in the real world,’” said Shternie Deitsch, director of the preschool. “Our take is a little different. Our take is the kids matter the way they are now. They are full people with intelligence, ideas, emotions and they are important as they are now. We view the kids as little explorers and researchers and we try to make the environment such that invites them to explore and learn on their own.”Deitsch said the Reggio Emilia Approach, based on ideas from Loris Malaguzzi in Northern Italy, fit perfectly with ideas that were instilled in her growing up Jewish in Boston, where her Rabbi would take time out of his day several times a year to meet with just the children. Instructors at the school are asked to present an idea to a child and allow them to take the learning from there. The kids are encouraged to ask questions and come up with their own answers by investigating and thinking critically.The preschool is clearly different from traditional preschools, for several reasons, the moment you enter the classroom. There are no overwhelming colorful cartoon letters or numbers — the décor is all natural and much of it is homemade. Alongside the traditional alphabet, there’s also a Hebrew alphabet. This time of year there are no Christmas trees, snowflakes or Santa Claus on the wall, but there is a menorah on the table, handmade menorahs in one area and dreidels in a basket on the floor.“The kids participate in creating the environment,” said Tara Leafman, one of the instructors at the school. “Our A, B, C’s and 1, 2, 3’s the kids colored the paper and we created the experience for them. They are very connected to the classroom itself.”While there are no specific religious lessons, the traditions and ideals of Judaism are seamlessly woven in daily in the classroom.

  • Keeping the Faith: The gift of mercy

    Some years ago I read about Charles Brown, a World War 2 pilot on his first mission, just before Christmas, 1943. His B-17 had been shot to pieces by German fighters and anti-aircraft guns. Half his crew was wounded, his tail gunner was dead, and he was flying alone over Germany, barely able to keep the plane aloft.Then, as if things could not be more desperate, Brown looked to his left and locked eyes with Franz Stigler, an ace German fighter pilot flying no more than a few feet off the B-17’s wing. Brown’s blood went cold; this was the end.Stigler, the German pilot, was thirsty for revenge. The Allied forces were responsible for his brother’s death, and they had been relentlessly bombing his country’s cities. Now he had a chance to retaliate. But as he came up behind the low-flying bomber, he recognized that it was shot to pieces. He could see the dead and wounded crew inside.Stigler, with one hand on the trigger and another on his rosary, couldn’t shoot. Instead, he nodded at Brown and protectively escorted the bomber over the North Sea and to the edge of Allied airspace. He took one last look at the American pilot, saluted, and peeled away.Brown landed safely, survived the war and eventually returned home where he would marry, have children, go to work for the State Department, and retire in Florida. But the older he got, the more Brown thought about that December day above Germany. He decided that he must find that German pilot.His search was showing little progress when he received an unexpected letter. It was from Franz Stigler! It read, “Dear Charles, all these years I wondered what happened to that B-17, did she make it or not?” Stigler was now retired in Canada and was making the same improbable search. The two pilots became best of friends, meeting as often as possible, corresponding, and talking weekly by phone.

  • Orlando: The Eucharistic Community of Francis of Assisi

    The Eucharistic Community of Francis of Assisi emphasizes “community” over going to church to pursue personal piety or to fulfill religious obligations. We consider the spread of Christianity in the early church due to how Christians loved and served one another. Therefore, we are devoted to one another through prayer and service.We are a sacramental community gathered around the person of Christ who feeds us with His words in Sacred Scripture and by His example. We see faith as a verb and not as a noun; we are more interested in how we live rather than in how we believe. Our articles of faith are limited to those of the Nicene and Apostle Creeds. Everything else is considered a matter of personal piety.We are a path and not a place. We view our efforts as an ecumenical participation in the efforts of entire Mystical Body of Christ. We do not have a backyard, a pope or national boundaries. We reach out to those in the greatest need of God’s mercy, like Francis of Assisi did, wherever they are.We have worship services, adult religious education programs, and outreach services such as providing food and clothing for the homeless, working with abandoned children in Peru, starting a chicken and egg cooperative in Guatemala as well as Bible study and prayer sessions.We have a Cindy Miller musical concert on Feb. 28, 2015 at the Red Mountain Center-Mesquite Auditorium, 7550 E. Adobe St. in Mesa to raise money for our Guatemala project.All are welcome to our worship services at the Spirit of Joy Lutheran Church, 1159 Greenfield Road in Gilbert. Our services are at 4 p.m. during the fall and winter; and at 5 p.m. during the spring and summer.

  • Shapiro: Whether we are religious or not, Christmas is everywhere

    he holidays are here. Carols and peppermint fill the air; twinkling lights delight the eye. All through the day, we’re greeted with “Merry Christmas.” Whether we are religious or not, Christmas is everywhere.There are other messages, to be sure. I occasionally spot a Menorah on a shop counter. My family was invited to a neighbor’s Divali celebration. Some feel that the presence of other holidays diminishes Christmas’ centrality in our society. That’s not my experience.I’ve lived on two different islands — Key West, Fla., and New Zealand’s North Island. Island dwellers, I’ve noticed, keep their elbows closer to their bodies — that is, they’re careful to keep their emotions in check so as not to upset others. The jerk you yell at from your car in the morning may just run the shop you enter that afternoon.America is no island, but I do wish we could keep our elbows in just a bit.Christmas is not my holiday. I don’t believe in the theology it espouses, and the sights and smells evoke nothing special for me. Snow holds no romance. Nonetheless, when someone says “Merry Christmas” to me, I don’t get offended. I take it as an expression of warmth and goodness. That is, in a nutshell, the experience of being a minority in America: We are constantly translating. The mainstream message doesn’t suit us perfectly, and we are required to adapt to it.Similarly, Christians (whether religious or secular) need to understand how overwhelming the Christmas season can be for those of us who aren’t part of the dominant culture. The carols — Rudolph notwithstanding — do have religious messages. The tree isn’t merely ornamental. Green and red tell larger stories. Even if we’re not dialed into the symbolic meanings, the gestures of Christmas time can be unsettling to non-Christians. It’s when we feel most out of place in American society. As kids, we became aware of our differences during Christmas. We learned to keep our mouths shut. Some — not all, but some — have unpleasant associations with the season because of the ways we were treated at school or by our neighbors. But in no way do we wish to diminish another person’s heartfelt celebration. On the contrary: While we may not celebrate what you celebrate, we are happy to celebrate with you as friends and neighbors. We share your joy.

  • Take me Home: Larry and Moe provide hours of entertainment

    Meet Larry and Moe … also known as “the dynamic duo.” These two boys will provide hours and hours of free entertainment whether adopted together or separately. After they’re each exhausted from playing they will seek out their humans for a good lap cuddle and to be pet. They are about 8 months old. They do not have to be adopted together. They do get along very well with each other, but they also get along well with other cats. Both Larry and Moe have great personalities and sweet faces. They have been tested for Felv/FIV, neutered, up to date on vaccinations, and microchipped. The adoption fee for a cat is $95.If interested in Larry and/or Moe, contact Friends for Life, 143 W. Vaughn Ave. in downtown Gilbert, at (480) 497-8296 or www.azfriends.org.

  • Keeping the Faith: The procession must go on

    Hans Christian Andersen first told the now familiar story of an emperor who spent all of his kingdom’s disposable wealth on being well dressed. He had a change of clothes for every hour of the day, and he spent more time in his dressing room than managing the affairs of his empire.Egotistical as he was, the emperor easily fell into the trap of two swindlers who claimed they could weave the most magnificent clothes imaginable. For a large sum of money, these two promised the emperor that he would be dressed in the finest tailored colors and patterns, but clothes made of this cloth had a wonderful way of becoming invisible to anyone who was unfit for his office.The emperor thought, “If I wore those clothes, I would be able to discover which men in my empire are unfit for their posts; and I could tell the wise men from the fools.” Of course, the Emperor was the fool. He dressed in his “new clothes” and went off in procession through the town.In a colossal case of group-think, nobody would confess that the emperor was naked for fear of being called a fool. At last a little child declared the obvious: “But he hasn’t got anything on!” This rippled through the crowd until finally everyone could admit the Emperor was indeed naked and had been duped by the two swindling weavers.The emperor shivered, for he suspected the crowd was right, but he could not admit it. He said, “The procession must go on.” So he walked more determined than ever, his head held high, proudly wearing a costume that wasn’t there. The emperor built a bogus façade, was stubbornly living in it, and had lost the ability to be honest with himself about his condition. Be certain, that when one loses the ability to be honest, he also loses the ability to change. It’s not only true of naked emperors; it’s true of us all.How many people have been trapped or ruined by the words, “The procession has got to go on?” Hiding an addiction; remaining in an abusive relationship; continually apologizing and covering for the failures of a spouse, a parent, or a business partner; maintaining religious beliefs for which they longer have conviction; propping up a naked life: All because the prospect of being honest is more terrifying than the exertion of constantly camouflaging their charade.

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