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  • Phoenix Boys Choir performs free spring concert

    The Phoenix Boys Choir is offering the East Valley community a free concert on Thursday, March 26 at 6:30 p.m. at Mountain View High School, 2700 E. Brown Road, Mesa. Enjoy the young and upcoming voices of the Phoenix Boys Choir’s Cadet and Town Choirs as they perform a selection of popular and classical songs, including well-known favorites like "Route 66," "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" and "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." The Phoenix Boys Choir is offering this free concert as a way to expand its community outreach initiative to help make music accessible to everyone in the greater Phoenix community.Admission to the Rising Star Showcase concert is free and open to the public. Doors open at 6 p.m.For details, visit www.phoenixboyschoir.org or call (602) 264-5328.

  • Valley residents out-work Tucsonians in WalletHub's latest findings

    PHOENIX -- It looks like Valley residents are harder working than their Baja Arizona counterparts.A new study by the financial advice firm WalletHub finds the average work week in the Old Pueblo is 36.4 hours. By contrast, Phoenicians are on the job 38.7 hours each week.And they're not even the most industrious.WalletHub finds Chandler residents on the job 39.1 hours. The figure for those living in Gilbert is 39.4 hours, with Scottsdale at 40.2 hours.The study also finds a higher labor force participation in every Maricopa County community studied than in Tucson.And yet Tucsonans are more likely than others not to get enough sleep.

  • Norovirus reported at Phoenix VA Hospital; 35 staff members, patients reportedly ill

    PHOENIX - Staff and patients at the Phoenix Veteran Affairs hospital have become sickened with a stomach virus.The VA said Tuesday, 16 patients and 19 staff members have become sick with norovirus, a contagious stomach and intestinal virus that can cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea.Everyone infected was from two inpatient mental health units, according to a press release. All but three people have fully recovered. Those who are still ill are being treated in a medical unit at the hospital.Laboratory tests confirmed that the virus was at the hospital. No new cases have been reported in the last day, said a spokesperson.To prevent the spread of the virus, the hospital did temporarily stop admitting patients to the mental health unit--those who needed care were sent to other providers or another VA facility--limited patient access and canceled group activities, disinfected the hospital and implemented protocol to make sure the virus didn't spread further, and educated patients on virus' signs and symptoms.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the virus is spread between infected people, touching contaminated surfaces, food or water.

  • Aspiring nurse receives new car

    Gilbert resident Lindsey Isaacs recently received a full-serviced 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix on Feb. 21 at a Target in Goodyear; a gift that allows her to pursue her dream of becoming a nurse and safely drive her three sons around.The car donation was made possible by the generous work of Isaacs’ scholarship, Helping Hands for Single Moms, and the efforts of businesses such as Valley Towing and Neighborhood Auto Repair Professionals (NARPRO).“NARPRO began with a commitment to local communities that remains strong today,” said James Garnand, NARPRO board member. “By supporting Lindsey’s family, Helping Hands for Single Moms and others, we hope to help build a stronger Arizona.”Isaacs’ previous form of transportation consisted of a spray-painted 1998 Honda Accord that not only logged more than 200,000 miles, but also had a broken dashboard and windows that didn’t work properly.One of the more challenging parts of Isaacs’ commute in her Honda was always remembering to keep her foot on the gas pedal while idling at a red light, otherwise the car would shut off, she said.Although her old Honda was on its “last leg,” Isaacs said it was hard to complain about the car because it got her from point A to point B. But she knew it was time to get a new set of wheels.

  • O’Sullivan’s latest win is sign of things to come

    It doesn’t seem to matter who else has a club in her hands.Whether it is playing against fellow juniors in Scotland, the best Europe has to offer, or older players who are putting everything they have in their professional careers while faced with the reality of losing to a 16-year-old, Hannah O’Sullivan seems to always find her way to the top of leader boards.O’Sullivan’s record-breaking win at the Gateway Classic, a Symetra Tour event at Longbow Golf Club in Mesa, was just the latest sign the Chandler resident appears to be on a career path that will have most of her Sunday’s blocked out for the foreseeable future.She served notice to the Arizona golf world when, as a Xavier freshman, she set the single day (64) and tournament record (12-under 132) to win the state tournament by nine strokes. She won it again as a sophomore.Then, in September, O’Sullivan, a California native, helped the U.S. Junior Ryder Cup team to a 16-8 win over the Europeans at The Blairgowrie Golf Club in Scotland.This week she was interviewed by the Golf Channel after becoming the youngest player in Symetra Tour history (16 years, 9 months, 11 days) to win a tournament by firing a 3-under 69 to capture the Gateway title with a three-day score of 15-under 201, a tournament record.

  • Chandler girl to kick off upcoming GCU cancer race

    Mia Bryant is doing well, at least as well as a 7 year old in her situation can be. She smiles often, bosses around her younger and older brothers (and her parents on occasion), and dances to the repurposed music found on a Kidz Bop album.The Chandler girl is just about fine, even in the days when she stays at the hospital for chemotherapy sessions to eradicate whatever remnants remain of the tumor that could have ended it all.The story her parents, Jimmy and Miriam, tell begins with the headache Mia came home with on May 14, 2014. A bit of children’s Tylenol appeared to resolve the situation, at least until the ensuing shopping trip when it came back. But it was just a headache — as Jimmy told her, “it’s no big problem, it’s no big deal.”Then Mia said she couldn’t see, and a trip to urgent care evolved into a trip to the hospital and a three-hour CT scan to a helicopter ride to Phoenix Children’s Hospital to treat a massive tumor in her brain. The diagnosis was medulloblastoma, a rather fast-growing type of cancer that, in Mia’s case, caused bleeding in her brain.“He (doctor) said it imploded on itself,” Jimmy said.There’s a hint of luck in the situation that manifests today, but the weeks following the surgery made it difficult to see that. Jimmy and Miriam said their daughter spent two months unable to walk or speak (they created a Bryant family sign-language system to resolve the second problem), along with three weeks on a ventilator.

  • Hear ye! Hear ye! Enter to become a RenFest Jr. Reporter!

    The Arizona Renaissance Festival and GetOut/East Valley Tribune have teamed up to a send a couple of young lords and ladies, ages 7-17, to be junior reporters at the 2015 Arizona Renaissance Festival.If you are selected your prize pack will include:• Tickets to the Arizona Renaissance Festival for you and your family• Special recognition from the King himself at the Royal Pavilion• The chance to write up your experience about your day at the festival and see it published in GetOut/East Valley TribuneTo enter, email your name, age, city of residence, phone number, and a short paragraph on why you should be chosen as junior reporter for the Arizona Renaissance Festival to GetOutAZ@getoutaz.com, subject line JR. REPORTER.

  • Diamondbacks reveal latest signature concession snack: The Churro Dog

    PHOENIX - The Arizona Diamondbacks just announced their latest, and sweetest, concession creation to be featured at Chase Field during the season.The Churro Dog will be the signature concession item for the Diamondbacks’ season, featuring a cinnamon churro wrapped in a long john chocolate-glazed doughnut.Atop the sweet twist on a hotdog will be scoops of frozen yogurt with caramel and chocolate sauces. Total, the dessert will estimate to 1,117 calories.The dessert will be featured on the main concourse at Chase Field at $8.50 apiece.The team will also be offering their signature item from last season, the D-Bat Dog. For $25, guests get a giant corn dog and a side of fries.

  • Phoenix Boys Choir performs free spring concert

    The Phoenix Boys Choir is offering the East Valley community a free concert on Thursday, March 26 at 6:30 p.m. at Mountain View High School, 2700 E. Brown Road, Mesa. Enjoy the young and upcoming voices of the Phoenix Boys Choir’s Cadet and Town Choirs as they perform a selection of popular and classical songs, including well-known favorites like "Route 66," "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" and "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." The Phoenix Boys Choir is offering this free concert as a way to expand its community outreach initiative to help make music accessible to everyone in the greater Phoenix community.Admission to the Rising Star Showcase concert is free and open to the public. Doors open at 6 p.m.For details, visit www.phoenixboyschoir.org or call (602) 264-5328.

  • A Collection of Ariz. food trucks

  • Tilted Kilt serves up shamrockin’ new menu

    Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery, a sports bar that pays homage to the old public houses of America, England, Scotland and Ireland, is gearing up for its annual Irish Hooley menu.The authentic menu is being offered through St. Patrick’s Day on March 17.The new Irish Hooley Menu will include the following items: Scotch Eggs - Two hard-boiled eggs wrapped in sweet and spicy sausage, covered with seasoned bread crumbs, and fried to a golden perfection. Served with a side of horseradish cream sauce. Olde Dublin Irish Stew - Tender beef pot roast, carrots, celery, onions and peas slow-cooked in a rich and hearty Guinness Beef Stock. Served with a side of garlic bread. Corned Beef and Cabbage -Slow-cooked tender corned beef served with steamed garlic butter carrots, red potatoes and braised green cabbage. Shepherd’s Pie – A traditional pub favorite with seasoned ground beef, carrots, peas and mushroom gravy topped with red skin mashed potatoes and Parmesan cheese. Served with garlic bread. Corned Beef Hash –A Tilted Kilt classic of diced tender corned beef, roasted red potatoes, carrots and peppers topped with two eggs cooked any style. Served with your choice of sourdough or marble rye toast. Corned Beef Sandwich - Sliced corned beef, braised shredded cabbage, Swiss cheese and spicy mustard served on your choice of a fresh hoagie roll or thick-cut marble rye bread. Served with a side of fresh cooked crispy potato chips. The Paddy Bomb is just one of the many Irish-themed drinks that Tilted Kilt will be serving. A crowd favorite, it turns green within seconds as Three Olives Orange Vodka and Blue Curacao is dropped into a half pint of Red Bull. The restaurant will also be offering a variety of beers on tap, Irish whiskey, shooters, bombers and brilliant bevvie’s.On St. Patrick’s Day, the Tilted Kilt will be hosting parties across the country and will feature the Irish Hooley Menu in addition to the Tilted Kilt beauties in traditional Scottish kilts, green beer and other festivities. Patrons may visit www.tiltedkilt.com to find out how their local Tilted Kilt is celebrating St. Patrick’s Day.

  • Tuesday: Score free pancakes at IHOP

    IHOP restaurants are celebrating the 10th anniversary of National Pancake Day on March 3.Once again, IHOP is offering one free short stack of their buttermilk pancakes for guests to enjoy in its restaurants in the hopes that they will pay it forward by making a donation to their local Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Shriners Hospital for Children, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society or other local charities.Participating IHOP restaurants plan to give away millions of free pancakes,” from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesday to celebrate this “Decade of Giving."Beginning at 5 a.m. Miss Arizona, Alexa Rogers, and Miss Arizona Outstanding Teen, Amber Barto, will learn how to make the “perfect pancake” and flip and serve pancakes to guests at the IHOP restaurant located at 2501 N. 44th Street in Phoenix.More than 1,500 IHOP restaurants across the United States will participate in this annual event which, to date, has raised $16 million for charity. All of the donations raised stay within the communities, helping provide lifesaving treatment and equipment for local sick and injured children.For the second year in a row, IHOP restaurants in Canada and Mexico will participate in the fundraiser, joined for the first time by IHOP restaurants in the Philippines. IHOP restaurants in Canada will again support the Children’s Miracle Network and IHOP restaurants in Mexico will raise money for Asociación Mexicana de Ayuda a Niños con Cáncer, that provides accommodations and resources to children undergoing treatment for cancer and their families. IHOP restaurants in the Philippines will be raising funds for The Kythe Foundation, which provides children with cancer and chronic illness opportunities to learn, play and grow while they are in the hospital.

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • Fuel prices rise again

    Arizonans once again have seen gas prices rise by more than a dime over the course of a week.AAA Arizona reports the average in Arizona is up by more than 12 cents to $2.433 a gallon. Tucson and Scottsdale have the least and most expensive fuel prices in Arizona at $2.281 and $2.540, respectively.The national average has increased by more than 11 cents to $2.455.

  • McDonald's to use chicken without certain antibiotics

    NEW YORK - McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine and milk from cows that are not treated with the artificial growth hormone rbST.The company says the chicken change will take place within the next two years. It says suppliers will still be able to use a type of antibiotic called ionophores that the company says keep chickens healthy and aren't used on humans. The milk change will take place later this year."Our customers want food that they feel great about eating -- all the way from the farm to the restaurant -- and these moves take a step toward better delivering on those expectations," Mike Andres, head of McDonald's U.S.A, said in a statement.The announcement comes as the fast-food giant struggles to shake its junk-food image amid intensifying competition from smaller rivals positioning themselves as more wholesome alternatives.McDonald's has long battled negative perceptions about its food, but the issue has become a bigger vulnerability as more people shift toward options they feel are made with natural ingredients. The "clean label" movement has prompted companies across the industry including Chipotle, Panera and Subway to purge ingredients with unrecognizable chemical names from their recipes, even while standing by their safety.After seeing customer visits to U.S. stores decline two years in a row, McDonald's had also recently hinted ingredient changes could be in store. Andres had said in a presentation to analysts in December it was something the company was looking it.

  • Banner, University of Arizona health systems merger complete

    TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — The University of Arizona Health Network's merger with Banner Health is now complete. The merger was finalized Friday, resulting in the creation of Banner-University Medical as a division of Phoenix-based Banner, making Banner the largest private employer in Arizona with more than 37,000 employees. Three hospitals have changed their names with the merger. The University of Arizona Medical Center-University Campus is now Banner University Medical Center Tucson, while the University of Arizona Medical Center-South Campus is now Banner-University Medical Center South. Also, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix is now Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix. University President Ann Weaver Hart said the merger will revolutionize academic medicine at a time of accelerating change in the health industry while benefiting the entire state.

  • AT&T teaches students about STEM at Mesa facility

    AT&T hosted its 17th annual National High Technology Day and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Career Tour on Feb. 27 at the company’s Mesa complex.The event, hosted at 1355 W. University Drive, aimed to inform the more than 60 high school students in attendance about careers in STEM industries through presentations from National Geographic and other professional companies.

  • Aspiring nurse receives new car

    Gilbert resident Lindsey Isaacs recently received a full-serviced 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix on Feb. 21 at a Target in Goodyear; a gift that allows her to pursue her dream of becoming a nurse and safely drive her three sons around.The car donation was made possible by the generous work of Isaacs’ scholarship, Helping Hands for Single Moms, and the efforts of businesses such as Valley Towing and Neighborhood Auto Repair Professionals (NARPRO).“NARPRO began with a commitment to local communities that remains strong today,” said James Garnand, NARPRO board member. “By supporting Lindsey’s family, Helping Hands for Single Moms and others, we hope to help build a stronger Arizona.”Isaacs’ previous form of transportation consisted of a spray-painted 1998 Honda Accord that not only logged more than 200,000 miles, but also had a broken dashboard and windows that didn’t work properly.One of the more challenging parts of Isaacs’ commute in her Honda was always remembering to keep her foot on the gas pedal while idling at a red light, otherwise the car would shut off, she said.Although her old Honda was on its “last leg,” Isaacs said it was hard to complain about the car because it got her from point A to point B. But she knew it was time to get a new set of wheels.

  • Let Joe Know: Be careful when buying a used car

    Would you know how to spot a repaired wreck if it was sitting on a used car lot?I found out it that was hard to do for some Valley people.We were at Tempe Marketplace with Carfax recently, asking people to take the “wrecked car challenge.”Carfax brought in three cars and we asked people to choose the car that had been repaired after a serious car accident.It had a salvaged title. But with new paint and a nice shine, it was hard to tell which one you should avoid.“To the average customer to the naked eye, it’s almost impossible to tell which one had major damage on it.” says Chris Basso, with Carfax.

Pets Food Health TV Travel

  • Thibideau: Does my loved one have Parkinson’s?

    Dear Caregiver Coach: My husband has tremors in his hands frequently and now shuffles when he walks; my friends say it is the beginning of Parkinson’s. What other conditions might mimic some of the Parkinson’s symptoms and how do I know what it is? — PerplexedDear Perplexed: First, only a medical doctor or a neurologist can accurately diagnose what is going on with your husband. And, your primary care doctor may in fact refer you to a neurologist if he or she thinks that is appropriate.However, here is some information from the Northwest Parkinson’s Association which addresses this issue and describes other diseases which may have similar symptoms:“The most recognizable syndrome, at least to the public eye, may be what George H.W. Bush has: vascular Parkinsonism, which is essentially clotting in the brain caused by mini-strokes.Some other conditions include:• Lewy body disease. This is characterized by the early onset of dementia and cognitive dysfunction. People can also have hallucinations, which makes treatment difficult, since anti-psychotics used to treat hallucinations can worsen other Parkinsonism symptoms.

  • Keeping the Faith: Behind every beautiful thing

    In his short life Vincent Van Gogh produced hundreds of watercolor paintings, sketches, and prints – some of which are the most valued in the world – now fetching tens of millions of dollars at auctions or private sales. Van Gogh’s posthumous success is a tremendous surprise, for his life was considered all but a mournful disaster. He was an insufferable friend; his struggles with mental illness, depression, malnutrition, insomnia, and alcoholism were well-known; and he failed at a number of attempted careers.One of those career choices was the Christian pastorate. “God has sent me to preach the Gospel to the poor,” Vincent wrote to his brother while still a young man in his twenties. So off he went to Amsterdam to enter the seminary, but Van Gogh failed the entrance exam. Undeterred, he entered a missionary school in Brussels. He flunked out after only three months.Still resolute in his chosen vocation, he convinced the Dutch Reformed Church to appoint him as a missionary pastor to the coal miners in the village of Borinage. There he succeeded in his own way. Broken-hearted by the poverty of the village and his parishioners, Van Gogh gave away all his possessions to the miners. He lived like a beggar himself, barely surviving. When the church authorities came to inspect his successful and growing ministry, they were appalled by him and his appearance. They removed him from his position because he “undermined the dignity of the priesthood.” Vincent never seemed to heal from this wound; a wound that played a role in him turning to the easel for the first time.In one of his iconic paintings, “The Church at Auvers” (attached to this post), Van Gogh’s pain from being rejected by the church bleeds off the page like his hues of blue and starry nights. It is a painting with a road leading to a massive house of worship. Yet the path, upon arriving at the church, is suddenly diverted.The road bypasses the stately church, and here is why: This church has no doors. After being rejected by the church, Van Gogh concluded that there was no way for him to get in. For him, religion was an empty room with no doors, and this painful discovery broke his heart. Yet, this pain played a significant role in his majestic creativity.Feeling like his calling had been redirected, Van Gogh picked up his brush as an artist in God’s service. The one rejected by the church for going to the rejected, said, “The great artists, the serious masters, tell us in their masterpieces what leads to God. One writes it in a book; another in a picture.”

  • Siebel: Dog tips: Good dog means no jumping

    Do you dread going to your sister’s house in fear, knowing that her 95-pound Labrador will jump all over your new dress slacks? A dog should not prohibit you from going to friends and families homes. Jumping is one of the single most challenging actions for a dog to control. Dogs love all people (most of the time), and when they exercise their acute sense of smell, sight, and sound to your new or returning guests, the chances of jumping are increased.Why, you ask? From puppyhood, dogs are naturally oral animals. They lick to induce taste, acceptance, and affection. In the wild, wolf pups jump up to their mother’s mouth to render food. But, this is Ahwatukee, not the wild, so no more jumping! Jumping can be drastically reduced by following the below simple tips:1. Practice entering your home and ignoring your dog. You’ll survive! No touching or eye contact, or high-frequency greetings to increase your dog’s energy. Remain calm so your dog will do the same. After returning in from a potty break, command your dog to sit. Count to five, and then praise with voice and affection. Always give affection below your waist, not above.2. Dogs want to be part of a “pack.” So, get in the habit of greeting your dog with your shoulders back and a strong firm posture. Clasp your hands together to look like the pitcher on a baseball team. When you look and act as a strong leader, your dog will begin to sit automatically out of respect. It is a dog’s instinct to bow to the leader.3. Less is more. If your dog is used to jumping on you as soon as you walk in the door, try turning sideways to limit the surface area for him to land on. After time, your dog will end up sliding down your legs as you turn, and then sitting when you again face him in your “pitcher” posture. If he jumps again, repeat the sideways turn. Dogs learn and thrive from “routine/repetition,” so this sideways turn will pay off in the long run.4. Finally, there is no perfect dog! Sure, dogs over 9-12 years old are close to perfect, but it came with great practice. So, when you have guests come over, put your dog on a leash. When he or she is calm after one to two minutes, take him off the leash and tell your guest to follow the above tips.

  • Television's 'Judge Judy' staying in session

    NEW YORK (AP) — Daytime television's most popular personality, "Judge Judy" Sheindlin, has extended her contract for three years and will keep her court in session into 2020. CBS Television Distribution didn't discuss terms of the deal on Monday. TV Guide has reported her current salary at $47 million a year — making her by far the highest-paid personality on television. Sheindlin is 72. The new deal also gives CBS first look at any projects by Sheindlin's production company, which makes the new court show "Hot Bench." "Judge Judy" is now in its 19th season. It averages more than 10 million viewers an episode, tops in daytime television for the past five years.

  • Mark Cuban will play the president on SyFy's 'Sharknado 3'

    NEW YORK (AP) — This summer's "Sharknado 3" will usher in the Cuban-Coulter administration. The SyFy network said Monday that Dallas Mavericks owner and "Shark Tank" star Mark Cuban will play the president of the United States in the third installment of the goofy "Sharknado" TV movie series, set to premiere in July. Conservative commentator and author Ann Coulter will be his vice president. The network previously said Bo Derek will have a cameo as star Tara Reid's mother, Jerry Springer will play a tourist and 'N Sync singer Chris Kirkpatrick will be a pool lifeguard. This year the toothy storm terrorizes Washington, D.C., before moving down to Florida.

  • Shapiro: Loving kindness found in acts large and small

    I stood in the rain in the parking lot of my grocery store, trying not to get soaked. I was a brand-new dad, and had hurriedly moved my son from the cart to the car seat. Then, I put the groceries in the trunk.And then I stood there, perplexed. I couldn’t put the cart back without leaving the baby alone in the car. I couldn’t take the baby out of the car without getting him wet. I couldn’t back out of my parking space unless I found some other place to put the cart, and I couldn’t find any other space. I felt stupid. I felt like a terrible father.I remember standing there thinking, “How can this be? I have a master’s degree — why can’t I figure this out?” I couldn’t figure it out because the problem had no solution.And then, out of nowhere, a woman came along and asked if she could return the cart for me. I’ve never been more grateful in my life.There was no solution for me on my own, but there were plenty of solutions as long as I expanded the situation, and got some help.A few weeks ago I was back in that parking lot, when I saw a woman unloading groceries. Her 3-year-old was already strapped into the car seat, but now she had a baby in the bassinet. She had no way to remove the cart without leaving one child behind. I asked if I could return it for her, and she was as grateful as I had been. “People don’t do things like that for each other,” she said. But I knew she was wrong. One had.

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