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  • Army Ranger breaks silence over Pat Tillman's death

    It's one of the most famous military mysteries of the past decade, Pat Tillman, the former ASU and Cardinals player turned Army Ranger killed in 2004 after he left the NFL to fight in Afghanistan.The Army said it was friendly fire, but never said whose shots killed Tillman. Three soldiers acknowledged firing at his position, but none have spoken publicly until now.Steven Elliott told ESPN's "Outside the Lines" that two convoys entered the mountains, but got separated. He said Tillman's group scaled a ridge line to help fellow rangers under attack, but a squad leader mistakenly thought an allied Afghan soldier next to Tillman was an enemy and opened fire.Elliott said he has been treated for PTSD and is speaking out now because he believes his story might provide hope for fellow veterans with similar problems. You can see more of the interview Sunday morning on ESPN.The interview is stirring up a lot of emotions, just days before the ten year anniversary of Tillman's death.

  • State budget approval cuts $730,000 from Higley Unified

    After weeks of back-and-forth discussions and negotiations among state lawmakers, public schools across Arizona now know how much they’ll lose in funding for their charter campuses.The resolution to the budget conflicts between the state House and Senate officially ended when Gov. Jan Brewer signed off on a $9.2 billion budget for fiscal year 2014-15 on April 11. While the 2014-15 budget is larger than its predecessor, the spending increase came with cuts to several programs, among them funding for public schools to convert campuses to charters, with the state chopping the expenditure from $33 million to $24.5 million.Arizona law allows for public school districts to convert campuses to charter schools, as long as one public school remains for every grade level. In a previous interview, Chandler Assistant Superintendent of Business Lana Berry said districts’ motivation for making the shift is the more than additional state funding that accounts for more than $1,000 per students. The decision does come with a few qualifiers; the additional money can only go to the charter schools, and districts that convert charters back to traditional campuses have to reimburse the state for those additional funds.The caveats haven’s dissuaded districts from converting traditional schools to charters in recent years or even opening schools as charters, which is what the Higley Unified School District did this school year when it opened Cooley and Sossaman middle schools. Higley Chief Financial Officer Kevin Hegarty said the district even followed a charter model when constructing the two campuses.But districts such as Higley, Paradise Valley and Maricopa Unified now have to account for a 25-percent decrease in charter school funding for the coming year. At Higley, the total comes to $730,000 in charter money and a total budget hit of approximately $2.2 million.What that means for Higley, Hegarty said, is a delay in the implementation of certain projects for the coming year, among them a plan to purchase new textbooks for classrooms.

  • Smith ends tenure as mayor amid congratulations

    Amid support from public officials and local executives, former Mesa Mayor Scott Smith officially concluded his more than five-year tenure earlier this week.First elected as part of the 2008 election, Smith served as mayor from January 2009 until this past Wednesday and was replaced by Vice Mayor Alex Finter on an interim basis.Smith resigned in order to enter the 2014 gubernatorial race. Among his opponents in the Republican primary contest are State Treasurer Doug Ducey, Secretary of State Ken Bennett, state Sen. Al Melvin, former GoDaddy.com executive Christine Jones and disbarred former Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas.“This has been wonderful; this community has been transformed,” Smith said during an event on April 16.Thursday’s event was a goodbye ceremony organized by the Mesa Chamber of Commerce that featured several community members providing the former mayor kudos for his efforts as mayor. The good wishes were tied to the H.E.A.T initiative that focused on four fields — health care, education, aerospace and technology — and began shortly after Smith took office.“One might say he fanned the fire that turned up the heat,” said Boeing Chief Engineer for Attack Helicopter John Schibler

  • Tempe man sentenced to 16 years in prison for murdering girlfriend

    A man who pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the death of his live-in girlfriend has been sentenced to 16 years in prison.A Maricopa County Superior Court spokesman says Douglas Ray George was sentenced Friday by Judge Robert Gottsfield.George in February changed his plea to guilty in the death of 23-year-old Annovedwin Begay-Barakzai.A passer-by found her beaten, stabbed and naked body on a Tempe street on June 15.Begay-Barakzai wasn't identified for weeks, and police even released a sketch of the woman hoping to identify her.A tip in the case led police to George. He had previously been arrested on suspicion of domestic violence assault on Begay-Barakzai, who declined to press charges.

  • Gilbert scraps plans for USA BMX headquarters

    The town of Gilbert has decided not to move forward with potential plans to build a training facility and headquarters for USA BMX.Dana Berchman, chief digital officer for Gilbert, said the town would like to focus on other elements of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan."Although a BMX facility is a part of the Master Plan, and would bring substantial recreational, economic and tourism benefits to the community, we believe there are other parks-related needs that require our attention first," said Mayor John Lewis in an emailed press release.Under the proposed agreement with USA BMX, the town of Gilbert would foot a majority of the $20 million BMX training and racing complex, which would be located near the intersection of Greenfield and Germann roads in Gilbert.Other buildings under the proposal would include a BMX arena, training facilities, a Hall of Fame and museum, a bike park and the headquarters.A public meeting was held earlier this month where members of the public brought up concerns about economic impact, noise and traffic.

  • Gas prices bump up by 3.6 cents

    Pump prices increased again this week by just less than 4 cents, although the state remains one of the cheapest places to purchase fuel.Triple-A Arizona reports the national average went up by 3.6 cents to $3.461 a gallon. Tucson was at the low end at $3.343 a gallon while Flagstaff remained the most expensive place in Arizona to purchase gas at $3.595 a gallon.Even with the jump, Arizona is still the ninth-cheapest state to fill the tank. The increase was also almost a penny less than the 4.5 cent increase in the national average, which is up to $3.657 per gallon.

  • A beautiful sound

    Whether you’re bringing a flute or a six-string to the table, a collaboration of good vibes and tunes are what you are sure to find in the Valley Acoustic Group.“(We’re) a group that’s meant to enjoy music together but not necessarily to give lessons,” says organizer Douglas Chandler.Ever since its creation two years ago, the Valley Acoustic Group has being making classics come back to life through an ecclectic group of musicians, ages 25 to 70, who are either picking up their instruments for the first time or picking them up again for the hundredth time.“It’s very informal, in the sense that we all enjoy improving our ability to make music. But we also don’t demand a specific skill range,” says Chandler.With each bi-monthly collaboration, held at the OneOhOne Gallery in downtown Mesa, comes a suggested set-list prepped every week by members, called “vagabonds.”“It’s a do-it-yourself group where members typically will decide what songs they want to play and try out, to see if they can do them before the next meet-up,” says Chandler.

  • ‘Bears’ the film is so, so adorable

    You can't really watch the film “Bears” with any expectation of plot or even a plethora of factoids for your kids to spout off randomly in the car. There are a few of those for sure (did you know that a bear's sense of smell is seven times stronger than a blood hound's?) but the film's purpose is evoke as many “awwwwwws” and “squeeeees” from the titular animals’ escapades as humanly possible.Another entry in the Disneynature documentary series – others include such efficiently titled films as “Oceans” and “Chimpanzee” – “Bears” is about, well, bears. There's a momma bear and two cubs, and the film follows their Alaskan adventures – from finding food to not becoming somebody else's food – from the end of one hibernation cycle to the start of another. Oh, and the voice of narrator John C. Reilly bounces about through the film's blessedly brief run time.That last line is often used as an insult, but it's honestly a compliment to the filmmakers, who opted against making an unnecessarily long movie and created something quick, painless and fairly entertaining. Props are also due to anyone willing to cut down a year's worth of footage – hours upon hours of film to process and ounces of pride to eat – to 13 minutes short of an hour-and-a-half movie.What's left is a film lacking in meat and burdened by both the “G” rating and the Disney label, which combine to diminish the documentary’s danger. Nature is a cruel, cruel mistress, but “Bears” only hints at what those animals face – in this case a lone wolf and a couple of enormous male bears lacking food – and the attempts to add a little drama are dampened by the inevitable happy ending. In other words, “Bears” won't create those childhood mental scars in your kids like “Bambi,” “Old Yeller” or “Up” did to you.Also missing is the educational experience one expects from a nature documentary. Sure, you get a few tidbits to dispense at parties (the one mentioned above is the only one that sticks out for me), but viewers won't learn much more about bears than they did before entering the cinema. To repurpose a Rick Pitino quote, David Attenborough isn't walking through that door, Morgan Freeman isn't walking through that door.Speaking in their stead is Reilly – an odd character actor who revels in comedies starring rather abnormal people (see Brule, Dr. Steve) yet remains a capable and competent dramatic actor in films like “Gangs of New York” and “Magnolia.” His serious side pops out in “Bears” whenever danger begins to waft through the atmosphere, but his overall tone is light and impeccably goofy and includes tangents that criticize a bear's lack of game in his pursuit of a mate.

  • California Guitar Trio to play MAC

    With a repertoire that ranges from re-workings of classical music to “Bohemian Rhapsody,” the progressive acoustic group California Guitar Trio (CGT) will perform a diverse program 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19, at Mesa Arts Center.The combination of technical mastery with an unparalleled collection of stylistic influences, including European classical music, rock, blues, jazz, world music, and surf music, has created a demand for their recordings and touring performances.The Trio’s music has been featured during television coverage of the Olympic Games (1998 and 2000), and on CBS, NBC, CNN WorldBeat and ESPN TV programs. CGT music was sent into outer space as wake-up music for the crew aboard NASA’s space shuttle Endeavour.In August 2004 CGT released “Whitewater,” featuring original works offset by a puzzle-work arrangement of a Bach lute suite and a mash-up of “(Ghost) Riders in the Sky” with The Doors’ “Riders on the Storm.”The group’s 2012 release, “Masterworks,” is an all-classical compilation featuring music by Beethoven, Vivaldi, Rossini and Part.For tickets, call (480) 644-6500 or visit MesaArtsCenter.com.

  • Kids: Experience ‘Legends of Oz’ at Tempe Marketplace

    Join Dorothy and Toto, from the upcoming 3D animated feature “Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return,” as they bring the magical land of Oz to Tempe Marketplace.The “Legends of Oz Express,” coming 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 19, to the shopping center’s District Stage, features a variety of activities for families ahead of the May 9 movie opening.Kids can make friendship pins in the Tin Man’s Friendship Club, make arts and crafts in the Scarecrow’s Workshop, and perform on the Lion’s “Mane” stage. iPad gaming stations will let kids will virtually follow the Yellow Brick Road, and Dorothy and friends will be there for pictures, prizes and fun.Guests are encouraged to bring a new book to donate to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix.For information, go to LegendsOfOzWorld.com.

  • MACFest wraps up this weekend with variety of artists

    April 19 is the last event of the 2013-2014 Mesa Arts and Crafts Festival season. Bring the family and pets down to see the festival’s talented local artists and their products, like artists Mike Shaw and Michelle Shaw, who share the same last name but specialize in very different artforms:Michelle Shaw: steampunk jewelryIf you’re into science fiction, steampunk or jewelry in general, you need to check out VictorianFolly.Cameos with rabbits, skeletons, mermaids, octopi, and alicorns (they’re like unicorns with wings) are among Michelle Shaw’s jewelry. You’ll also find earrings and necklaces of scarab gems and Ancient Egyptian themes, and earrings with pendants like mer-lions and bird skulls.Then, of course, you’ll witness Michelle’s pièce de résistance: her steampunk line.Watch faces and tiny gears are married with pieces of copper, silver and brass to create one-of-a-kind necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings you can wear on any occasion. Perhaps the most unique pieces of the VictorianFolly line are necklaces made with the rare porcelain dials of Braille watches, which were actually used once upon a time.

  • See “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves”

    Valley Youth Theatre stages a musical comedy based on the classic fairy tale.DETAILS >> 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 18, 12 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19, 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday, April 20; runs through April 27. Valley Youth Theatre, 525 N. First St., Phoenix. $18. (602) 253-8188 or VYT.com.

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • Opening of State Route 24 could expedite Gateway growth

    A soon-to-open stretch of highway in Mesa is expected to alleviate potential driving problems and continue the expansion of a growing region in the city.Once it’s opened in May, the mile-long segment of State Route 24 will connect the Loop 202 Santan Freeway and Ellsworth Road, which is located near the Eastmark Development and Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. Construction on the project began in 2012, although Mesa Gateway Senior Project Manager Scot Rigby said the plan has been in the works for about a decade.Although the route connects Ellsworth and the Loop 202, the long-term goal is to push State Route 24 well beyond those boundaries. According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, the highway will connect the southeast section of Maricopa County to the northeast portion of Pinal County, including Queen Creek. Progress on the extension beyond Mesa is halted, however, until Pinal County completes its North-South Corridor Study and a source of funding for the rest of the project is found.Rigby said the now-open section of State Route 24 was paid for by the city of Mesa, which he said fronted the money to ADOT to expedite the project. He said the decision to do so helped cut the total cost from an estimated $200 million, to between $110 and $120 million.It’s something of a symbolic gesture, as Rigby said Mesa’s willingness to move forward reflects a sense of reliability among potential investors.“Now we put the plan together and within 10 years we built the project,” he said.

  • State budget approval cuts $730,000 from Higley Unified

    After weeks of back-and-forth discussions and negotiations among state lawmakers, public schools across Arizona now know how much they’ll lose in funding for their charter campuses.The resolution to the budget conflicts between the state House and Senate officially ended when Gov. Jan Brewer signed off on a $9.2 billion budget for fiscal year 2014-15 on April 11. While the 2014-15 budget is larger than its predecessor, the spending increase came with cuts to several programs, among them funding for public schools to convert campuses to charters, with the state chopping the expenditure from $33 million to $24.5 million.Arizona law allows for public school districts to convert campuses to charter schools, as long as one public school remains for every grade level. In a previous interview, Chandler Assistant Superintendent of Business Lana Berry said districts’ motivation for making the shift is the more than additional state funding that accounts for more than $1,000 per students. The decision does come with a few qualifiers; the additional money can only go to the charter schools, and districts that convert charters back to traditional campuses have to reimburse the state for those additional funds.The caveats haven’s dissuaded districts from converting traditional schools to charters in recent years or even opening schools as charters, which is what the Higley Unified School District did this school year when it opened Cooley and Sossaman middle schools. Higley Chief Financial Officer Kevin Hegarty said the district even followed a charter model when constructing the two campuses.But districts such as Higley, Paradise Valley and Maricopa Unified now have to account for a 25-percent decrease in charter school funding for the coming year. At Higley, the total comes to $730,000 in charter money and a total budget hit of approximately $2.2 million.What that means for Higley, Hegarty said, is a delay in the implementation of certain projects for the coming year, among them a plan to purchase new textbooks for classrooms.

  • Smith ends tenure as mayor amid congratulations

    Amid support from public officials and local executives, former Mesa Mayor Scott Smith officially concluded his more than five-year tenure earlier this week.First elected as part of the 2008 election, Smith served as mayor from January 2009 until this past Wednesday and was replaced by Vice Mayor Alex Finter on an interim basis.Smith resigned in order to enter the 2014 gubernatorial race. Among his opponents in the Republican primary contest are State Treasurer Doug Ducey, Secretary of State Ken Bennett, state Sen. Al Melvin, former GoDaddy.com executive Christine Jones and disbarred former Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas.“This has been wonderful; this community has been transformed,” Smith said during an event on April 16.Thursday’s event was a goodbye ceremony organized by the Mesa Chamber of Commerce that featured several community members providing the former mayor kudos for his efforts as mayor. The good wishes were tied to the H.E.A.T initiative that focused on four fields — health care, education, aerospace and technology — and began shortly after Smith took office.“One might say he fanned the fire that turned up the heat,” said Boeing Chief Engineer for Attack Helicopter John Schibler

  • Company wants to launch Arizona residents to the precipice of space

    A Tucson firm is hoping to launch Arizonans toward the edge of space – or maybe somewhere close to that – from Southern Arizona.Now they need state lawmakers to clear the path.The plan by Paragon Space Development Corp. is to use a balloon to float passengers up 20 miles in a capsule, leave them there to ooh and aah at the view for about two hours and then parachute the whole mechanism back to earth. They could wind up 300 miles downrange but would be flown back to the launch site.Costs and logistics aside, company CEO and co-founder Taber MacCallum said he has another hurdle to overcome: Getting the required insurance. But he can't do that until Arizona law is amended to spell out, in black and white, that passengers engaged in space travel can waive their right to sue if something goes wrong – and that such agreements are valid and enforceable in Arizona courts.And a measure sponsored by Rep. Ethan Orr, R-Tucson, to do just that, which already has cleared the House, is set for Senate debate on Monday.MacCallum, who is heading up Paragon's World View Enterpises subsidiary that will operate the flights, said the Federal Aviation Administration, which governs what his company wants to do, requires passengers be warned of the risks.

  • Toastmasters to celebrate fourth anniversary

    The San Tan Toastmasters Club will host an event to celebrate its fourth anniversary on April 22.The event will provide the public with information about their club, which helps people become better leaders and speakers.Featured speakers at the event include Diane Travers Shipman and Alan Pease, a former member and current candidate for the Arizona Senate Legislative District 8.Public meetings for the club are each Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the SRP Call Center in San Tan Valley.For more information about the Toastmasters Club, visit www.santantoastmasters.org.

  • Legacy campus to host real estate presentation

    The Southeast Valley Regional Association of Realtors will host “What Realtors Should Never Forget About Education,” a mixer and presentation, on April 24 at 7 p.m. The event will take place at Legacy Traditional School at 41800 N. Barnes Parkway in Queen Creek.For more information, call (480) 270-5483.

Pets Food Health TV Travel

  • House moves forward with Medicaid cap

    More than 140,000 of the state's long-term unemployed could eventually find themselves without health insurance.The state House on Thursday gave final approval to legislation designed to pave the way for a five-year lifetime limit on Medicaid benefits. HB 2367 also would require those who are still eligible to be employed, looking for work or in a job-training program.here's a catch of sorts, though: Federal Medicaid regulations currently do not allow such limits. But the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which funds the majority of Medicaid costs, does allow states to seek waivers to find more cost-effective ways of providing care. This legislation requires state officials to seek those waivers, not just this year but every year from now on.The measure was crafted by House Speaker Andy Tobin, R-Paulden. Tobin was a foe of the decision by Gov. Jan Brewer to take advantage of the federal Affordable Care Act which allows states to expand eligibility for their Medicaid programs to those up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. That is $26,951 for a family of three. Brewer prevailed, over the objections of Tobin and most Republicans.So Tobin, who also is running for Congress, said his legislation would help control future costs.Tobin said while the federal government is picking up virtually all the costs of the expansion from current limits of the federal poverty level, that won't last forever. That, he said, means the state needs to start looking now for ways to trim the price tag.

  • White walls? The trick is choosing the right white

    NEW YORK — So you want to paint a room white. Sounds easy, until you go to the hardware store to buy paint and discover there are dozens of whites to choose from.Many have familiar yet poetic names that conjure up ever-so-slightly different hues: cream, pearl, vanilla, snow, chalk, ivory, jasmine, bone. But the closer you look, the more confusing the choices are. You want a plain, basic white, but the purest white on the color chart looks a little harsh next to all those soft shades with just a hint of something else — beige, gray, peach, rose, yellow or the palest-ever blue or green.Often people default to white because they don't want strong colors in their home. But as it turns out, "it's harder to choose white than any other color," said Sharon Grech, a color design expert at Benjamin Moore Paints.She says Benjamin Moore alone offers more than 150 whites, and "when people are choosing white, I see more people unhappy or making a mistake or being shocked at the color than when they choose other colors."And watch out if you go with a pure white untinted by any other hue. Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, which maintains color standards, says "the purity and cleanliness" of the purest whites "can also make them feel very sterile and cold. And you can literally get eyestrain from too much dazzling white. So you've got to be cautious. Most people don't want to live with hospital white."More so than with other colors, whites are also more influenced by colors around them, so Grech says it's crucial to try a sample to see how it looks in the room. Buy a pint and paint a 2-by-2-foot board that you can move around your home. "Sometimes the sun hits it one way or another at different times of day, or it looks different against the rug, or you realize it's got a lot of pink in it or green in it," she said. "It might look totally different in the morning than at night."

  • Louisville: 5 free things for visitors to do

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. — When it's Kentucky Derby season in Louisville, money seems to flow faster than the Ohio River. Hotels and restaurants fill up; bars serve mint juleps and fine Kentucky bourbon. Shopping includes a hunt for the colorful hats worn as a Derby tradition. Parties are thrown, and wagers are plunked down on can't-miss colts and longshots alike as fans guess which horse will win the famous race at Churchill Downs.Yet there are other sure bets for relaxation and entertainment that don't cost a thing as folks head to bluegrass country for the Derby, which takes place May 3. Kentucky's largest city offers a mix of free contemporary and historic sites — along with blooming dogwood trees.CAVE HILL CEMETERYThe final resting place for many of Louisville's most prominent citizens of the 19th and 20th centuries, the nearly 300-acre (120-hectare) cemetery opened in 1848. It features ornate marble and granite monuments, shaded by trees seemingly as distinctive as the headstones dotting the landscape. Trees of many varieties loom over the rolling grounds situated east of downtown. Each spring and fall, the cemetery is ablaze in colors. It draws tours from groups of garden, Civil War and history buffs. About 5,500 soldiers are buried here, mostly from the Civil War.Luminaries buried in the cemetery include politicians, business leaders and bourbon barons. Two of the most notable are George Rogers Clark — an early frontiersman and soldier and the brother of William Clark, who co-led the Lewis and Clark expedition — and Colonel Harland Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Sanders' granite memorial features a bust of the goateed entrepreneur, whose likeness is still synonymous with the chicken chain he started. Visitors sometimes place a bucket of chicken at his grave.WATERFRONT PARK

  • Moving asparagus to the center of your plate

    Asparagus has been a delicious symbol of spring since at least as far back as the Greeks, who called it asparagos — literally, "to spring up." But however it is spelled, it makes me happy.Most grocers sell asparagus in a range of sizes, from thin and willowy to thick and stocky. Whatever the size, look for stalks that are firm and smooth from top to bottom, with tight, un-feathery tips. Also check that the grocer stored it properly, because asparagus is quite perishable. It should be stored stem down in ice or a bit of water.Once you get the asparagus home, arrange the stalks standing on their bottoms in a glass jar filled with 1/2 inch of water, or in a zip-close plastic bag with damp paper towel wrapped around the bottoms of the stems. And try to eat your beautiful asparagus within a day or two of purchase, when it's still at its peak of freshness.When it comes to prepping asparagus, I have one rule: If the stem is more than 1/3 inch thick, it must be peeled. Doing so ensures the spear will cook evenly. If you don't peel it, you'll overcook the tip before the stem becomes tender. Another reason to lose the peel on a thick stalk is that it's tough.If, however, it strikes you as wasteful to lose those peels, you can gather them up (along with the tough bottoms of the stalks, which you also need to discard) and simmer them in chicken or vegetable broth to make a clear and flavorful asparagus soup.Once prepped, there are any number of delicious ways to cook asparagus. To start, there's the old tried and true — briefly boiling or steaming the spears, then topping them with butter or vinaigrette. Simple and wonderful. It also can be grilled, broiled or roasted at high heat, all of which amplify its natural sugars. By the way, I think it is asparagus' natural sweetness that persuades usually veggie-averse children to make an exception.

  • Frozen food makers plan PR push as sales slip

    NEW YORK — Frozen foods are about to get some badly needed image therapy.With sales slipping in the category, frozen food makers are in the final stages of preparing a major public relations campaign to defend the nutritional reputation of their products. The push will include what are said to be the first national TV ads on behalf of the industry as a whole, as well as social media and in-store promotions.Kraig Naasz, president of the American Frozen Food Institute, confirmed that the industry trade group plans to launch the "multiyear, multimillion dollar" campaign in early May.He declined to provide details but said the thrust of the campaign would be to educate people that the freezing process is just a way to hit the "pause button" to lock in the nutrients, quality and taste of fresh food. It's the biggest marketing push on behalf of the industry to date and the first to include national TV ads, according to the American Frozen Food Institute.The group, based in McLean, Va., represents companies including Nestle USA, which makes Hot Pockets, Lean Cuisine and Stouffer's, and ConAgra, which makes Healthy Choice and Marie Callender's.The campaign comes as Americans are increasingly reaching for foods they feel are fresh. That has hurt the performance of many frozen foods, which are often seen as being processed and full of preservatives or sodium.

  • Lawmakers seek federal approval to impose yearly restrictions on Medicaid recipients

    State senators voted Tuesday to require state officials to petition the federal government every year to allow Arizona to impose new restrictions on Medicaid recipients.HB 2367 seeks to impose a requirement that those getting government-provided health insurance be working, actively seeking employment or attending a job training program. Exemptions would be available if the person is sole caregiver to a family member younger than 5 or is getting long-term disability benefits.The legislation also seeks to impose a five-year limit on benefits. But it does say that does not apply if the person is working at a low-wage job whose earnings still qualify him or her for the coverage. The House already has approved the measure.

Local Guitar Group Meets in Downtown Mesa

A local guitar group based in Mesa, Ariz. meets every other sunday for musical fun, community,...

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