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  • Health care laws providing more access for Mesa residents

    Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Arizona’s expansion of Medicaid, health care may be more available to residents in Mesa and the rest of the East Valley than it ever has before.Since January, nearly 300,000 people across Arizona have signed up for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS). More than 120,000 Arizona residents signed up through the marketplace during the enrollment period.While these numbers are tougher to parse out to the city and county levels, it does mean a lot more people have access to affordable health care.“As a result of the growth in AHCCCS and marketplace coverage, health care systems across the state, including Banner Health, are seeing a decrease in uncompensated care,” said Corey Schubert, public relations specialist for Banner Health, in an email.That doesn’t mean that everything is coming up roses for everyone. Dr. Brent Nelson, area medical director for NextCare, says some have traded a lack of coverage for other deficits.“Anecdotally, it does appear that we see more uninsured patients now than we have in the past, but we are also seeing some of those uninsured people transition onto plans,” said Nelson. “What we also notice is that many people have a much higher deductible, so a lot of the visit charges are out-of-pocket expenses for the patients.”

  • Gilbert resident blends education, coloring with booklets

    A lingering cliché tied to education is the description of subjects like math as boring, a topic of study done to complete graduation requirements than for any enjoyable purpose. It’s untrue because math, like any subject, has ardent fans and because it’s not necessarily the subject matter that’s the issue; rather, it’s how the material is presented that’s important.Take, for example, the Coloring Squared books created by Gilbert resident Cameron Krantzman, which are an amalgamation of basic mathematical concepts and the simple joys of coloring.Anyone who spent a few hours as a kid coloring those paint-by-numbers pictures has a familiarity with the gist of the idea. The page is filled with numbers which correspond with a certain color — yellow could be the number one, red the number two and so on — and the painter fills in each spot with the corresponding paint color until a picture arises.Krantzman took that as the basis for his books and replaced the numbers with an answer to a question within the box. Take the image of a volcano on the Coloring Squared website: to come up with the right picture, students have to answer multiplication problems and use the correct color for the answer. An incorrect answer leads to an incorrect color and thus creates a painting that appears wonky, and a lesson to boot.“It makes it (learning) more engaging and more rigorous,” he said.Paintings include dinosaurs, ballerinas, penguins and even a few familiar characters from pop culture. The one thing they all have in common though is the quality of the image, as the pictures have a rather strong 8-bit Nintendo vibe.

  • Williams Field defense steps up in 31-7 home win over Show Low

    Williams Field senior running back Braedyn Bushman ran for two touchdowns in the second half to help the Blackhawks secure a 31-7 victory over Show Low on Friday night.Bushman finished the night with 25 carries for 172 rushing yards and the two rushing touchdowns in the final two quarters, but he and the rest of the Blackhawks offense had a hard time finding the end zone early in the game. Despite dominating the time of possession, the Williams Field offense stalled in the first half because of penalties and turnovers.“We were just sloppy,” said Williams Field head coach Steve Campbell. “The good news is that they’re things that we can clean up. I think that in game one, there’s a lot of that. There’s a lot of sloppiness. You’re not used to going against other opponents. You’re not used to a lot of the atmosphere and that type of thing.”The Blackhawks finished the game with 117 total penalty yards. Campbell said he was still content with the performance, especially since it was nine of his starters first varsity game.When the Williams Field offense did not hinder itself, it had no problem moving the ball down the field, and Bushman said the Blackhawks cleaned up their act in the second half.“I think really what happened was we just stopped the mental mistakes,” he said. “We stopped doing the little off-sides penalties. We started doing the little things right and we stopped shooting ourselves in the foot with stupid little mistakes.”

  • Gilbert Campo Verde opens season with 35-7 win against Goldwater

    This early in the season, football teams are still trying to work out the kinks. Campo Verde coach Max Ragsdale feels like there are still several of them to be worked out in his team despite beating Barry Goldwater 35-7 on Friday night.“A lot of room for improvement,” he said. “A lot of mental errors.”Campo Verde (1-0) jumped out to a 14-0 lead on two rushing touchdowns from running back Zac Wheeler. The Coyotes’ rushing attack worked well, as Wheeler finished with 82 yards and two touchdowns on 12 carries.“I felt we did pretty good,” he said. “Obviously we need a little bit more tweaks, we’re not all of the way there yet. We need to pick up the intensity and a little bit more tempo but overall we did alright.”The passing game didn’t fare as well as the ground attack; Campo Verde quarterbacks Cole Pineda and Dylan Wright combined to go 6-of-20 for 83 yards and two touchdowns. The battle between the two is still ongoing, Ragsdale said.“We’re still evaluating. We don’t know who our guy is,” he said. “We wanted to make sure everybody got some reps, live game reps behind the first group of offensive linemen and we wanted to make sure it got done that way.”

  • Burke carries Chandler Hamilton to easy 43-7 win over Sandra Day O'Connor

    Hamilton junior running back Kyeler Burke came into the season with a chip on his shoulder after an injury sidelined what could have been a star sophomore season. In the Huskies’ season opener against Sandra Day O’Connor, Burke looked in midseason form, leading Hamilton to a 43-7 victory.Burke tallied 83 rushing yards, including a 20-yard touchdown run on an option pitch from Hamilton quarterback James Sosinski in the first quarter. Burke also caught eight passes for 131 yards and a touchdown.“I just felt like I had something to prove,” Burke said. “The first couple of games (in 2013) I played well but then I got injured and it messed up my entire season. So I felt like I had something to prove to my team and to all the people watching.”Hamilton received the opening kickoff and marched 72 yards in just under five minutes to put up the first points of the game. Sosinski capped the drive with his first touchdown pass of the game, a 13-yard strike to tight end Luc Gauthier.From there Burke took over, scoring the next two Hamilton touchdowns, one on the ground and one through the air, the latter coming in the form of a 51-yard touchdown reception on third down midway through the first quarter. Sosinski found Burke open in the middle of the field and Burke did the rest, outracing two Falcon defenders to the endzone.“I have known James (Sosinski) since I was in eighth grade,” Burke said. “We went to a spring camp together and ever since then we have been really good friends. We play basketball together. We are brothers.”

  • El Palacio in Chandler hosting third annual taco festival

    If you’re looking for a brief beach getaway, but don’t feel like driving to the nearest coastline, there might be a solution for you.El Palacio of Chandler is hosting its third annual Rockin’ Taco Street Fest with a “Find your beach” theme on Saturday, Sept. 13, the weekend before Mexico’s independence day (Sept. 16).“We decided to go with something a little more traditional and celebrate Mexico’s actual independence day,” El Palacio owner and head chef Anthony Serrano said.The restaurant, located at 2950 E. Germann Road, will have several fun events including a salsa competition, margarita bar, beach games and live entertainment from 4-10 p.m.The festival is Serrano’s brainchild. He wanted to have a family-oriented event to beat the heat as well as celebrate Mexican culture.“Our goal is for everyone to have a good time and people can become a little more aware of the restaurant and the fact that we’re family owned and we do our best to help out the local community,” Serrano said.

  • Quick Look: New this week at the movies

    >> This information is provided in community partnership with Harkins Theatres. For showtimes, theater locations and tickets, go to HarkinsTheatres.com.A Five Star Life (subtitled)Stylish and independent, Irene is a single career woman in her forties with a job to die for. As a luxury hotel critic, she checks into the world’s finest establishments incognito to assess their standards, meticulously judging every detail from the concierge’s manners to the temperature of the food to the quality of the bedsheets. Her elegant, unattached lifestyle affords her the freedom to jet around the globe at a moment’s notice to experience a world of luxury, but doesn’t leave her with much of a personal life. On the rare occasions she’s not working, Irene’s world revolves around her absent-minded sister Silvia, two lively young nieces, and best friend — and former lover — Andrea. But when Silvia begins to deal with marital problems and Andrea faces an unexpected life change, Irene’s small support network is fractured and she struggles to balance a glamorous career with the growing desire for something more. Starring: Lesley Manville, Margherita Buy, Stefano Accorsi, Alessia Barela, Gianmarco Tognazzi. Not RatedEs El Chapo?In February, the world’s biggest drug lord, Chapo Guzman, was reportedly captured in Mazatlan, Mexico, without a single shot being fired. Many people in Mexico and the U.S. don’t believe it’s the real Chapo Guzman who was arrested. Filmmaker Charlie Minn visits the home state of Chapo Guzman in Mexico to get answers. Not RatedIf I Stay

  • ‘When the Game Stands Tall’ gets it right, says Higley’s Zubey

    Inspirational sports movies are not uncommon, but the 12-year, 151-game winning streak of the De La Salle High School football team — the longest consecutive winning streak in American team sports history — is extraordinary. That story and the story of Coach Bob Ladouceur comes to the big screen Friday, Aug. 22, in director Thomas Carter’s film “When the Game Stands Tall,” based on Neil Hayes’ book of the same name.The film, starring Jim Caviezel as the soft-spoken Ladouceur and Michael Chiklis as assistant coach Terry Eidson, starts in 2003, when the streak comes to an end, but the making of young men begins.“It ain’t about the football. It ain’t about scoring touchdowns. It’s about moving you in a direction that can assist you and help you to grow up … so that when you take your place out in the world and out in our community you can be depended on,” Coach “Lad” tells his team in a scene from the film.That focus on character, service to others, and caring for each other like family is true to life, says Higley High School football coach Eddy Zubey, who graduated from De La Salle in 1995, having played in the ’92, ’93, and ’94 seasons with the Spartans. Zubey’s older brother also graduated from De La Salle — a private Roman Catholic school for boys in Concord, Calif. Their father coached freshman football there before passing away from cancer.“Coach Lad taught me stuff my mom couldn’t, like how to shave. My situation was unique from the standpoint that he knew my dad. I was only 7 years old when my dad passed away and my mom never remarried. Coach Lad really took me under his wing,” says Zubey, who saw the movie in a pre-release screening.Zubey says Caviezel “nailed” his portrayal of Coach Ladouceur, who just retired in 2013 as head coach at De La Salle, where he is now the running backs coach. Ladouceur acted as a consultant for the film, as did his assistant coach, Terry Eidson.

  • Worth the Trip: Elgin wine fest and Prescott rodeo

    ELGINMagdelena BashSaunter down to southern Arizona, where the elevation is higher, the air cooler, and the wine flows in abundance, particularly this weekend at the annual harvest festival — named in honor of the owner’s grandmother, who celebrates her 95th birthday this year — at Kief-Joshua Vineyards, where you’ll enjoy wine tastings, food, and live music from country-western singer Andy Hersey and the well-known Phoenix group The Dry River Yacht Club.DETAILS >> 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 23. Kief-Joshua Vineyards, 370 Elgin Road, Elgin. Admission is free, tastings are $8 (which includes a souvenir glass) or $5 if you bring your own glass. (520) 455-5582 or KJ-Vineyards.com.PRESCOTTCowboy Capital Professional Bull Riding

  • Chandler Center For The Arts celebrates 25 years with free weekend events

    Three days of free events kick off the Chandler Center for the Arts’ 25th season. Plugged In, a concert featuring nine of the best youth bands in the Valley, starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22. On Saturday, the center hosts an open house during the day with face painting, balloon artists and live music on three stages followed by a 7:30 p.m. performance of The Music of Motown starring Joe Bourne playing the Motown hits of the 1960s. On Sunday at 3 p.m., ¡FlaMEXico! celebrates the musical confluences of Spain’s flamenco and Mexico’s mariachi styles.DETAILS>> Aug. 22-24, times vary. Chandler Center for the Arts, 250 N. Arizona Ave., Chandler. Free. (480) 782-2680 or ChandlerCenter.org.

  • Tempe Center for the Arts kicks off fall season with free event

    Craving a night out that includes mind-expanding entertainment? Tempe Center for the Arts Fall Arts Kick Off event — offering free performances, visual art displays and a variety of food samples — is just the ticket, and the best part is, it’s free, leaving plenty of dough to take a date out to dinner before the show.DETAILS >> 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22. Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway. (480) 350-2822 or Tempe.gov. Free.

  • Photos: Ice Bucket Challenge at T.C. Eggington's

    Supporters raise $3000 during the Ice Bucket Challenge to support ALS at T.C. Eggington's in Mesa on Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014. 

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  • Health care laws providing more access for Mesa residents

    Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Arizona’s expansion of Medicaid, health care may be more available to residents in Mesa and the rest of the East Valley than it ever has before.Since January, nearly 300,000 people across Arizona have signed up for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS). More than 120,000 Arizona residents signed up through the marketplace during the enrollment period.While these numbers are tougher to parse out to the city and county levels, it does mean a lot more people have access to affordable health care.“As a result of the growth in AHCCCS and marketplace coverage, health care systems across the state, including Banner Health, are seeing a decrease in uncompensated care,” said Corey Schubert, public relations specialist for Banner Health, in an email.That doesn’t mean that everything is coming up roses for everyone. Dr. Brent Nelson, area medical director for NextCare, says some have traded a lack of coverage for other deficits.“Anecdotally, it does appear that we see more uninsured patients now than we have in the past, but we are also seeing some of those uninsured people transition onto plans,” said Nelson. “What we also notice is that many people have a much higher deductible, so a lot of the visit charges are out-of-pocket expenses for the patients.”

  • Gilbert resident blends education, coloring with booklets

    A lingering cliché tied to education is the description of subjects like math as boring, a topic of study done to complete graduation requirements than for any enjoyable purpose. It’s untrue because math, like any subject, has ardent fans and because it’s not necessarily the subject matter that’s the issue; rather, it’s how the material is presented that’s important.Take, for example, the Coloring Squared books created by Gilbert resident Cameron Krantzman, which are an amalgamation of basic mathematical concepts and the simple joys of coloring.Anyone who spent a few hours as a kid coloring those paint-by-numbers pictures has a familiarity with the gist of the idea. The page is filled with numbers which correspond with a certain color — yellow could be the number one, red the number two and so on — and the painter fills in each spot with the corresponding paint color until a picture arises.Krantzman took that as the basis for his books and replaced the numbers with an answer to a question within the box. Take the image of a volcano on the Coloring Squared website: to come up with the right picture, students have to answer multiplication problems and use the correct color for the answer. An incorrect answer leads to an incorrect color and thus creates a painting that appears wonky, and a lesson to boot.“It makes it (learning) more engaging and more rigorous,” he said.Paintings include dinosaurs, ballerinas, penguins and even a few familiar characters from pop culture. The one thing they all have in common though is the quality of the image, as the pictures have a rather strong 8-bit Nintendo vibe.

  • East Valley Tribune advertising rep Kat Hollingsworth took the ice bucket challenge for ALS on Aug. 22.

    Kat Hollingsworth and the ice bucket challenge

    East Valley Tribune advertising rep Kat Hollingsworth took the ice bucket challenge for ALS on Aug. 22.

  • El Palacio in Chandler hosting third annual taco festival

    If you’re looking for a brief beach getaway, but don’t feel like driving to the nearest coastline, there might be a solution for you.El Palacio of Chandler is hosting its third annual Rockin’ Taco Street Fest with a “Find your beach” theme on Saturday, Sept. 13, the weekend before Mexico’s independence day (Sept. 16).“We decided to go with something a little more traditional and celebrate Mexico’s actual independence day,” El Palacio owner and head chef Anthony Serrano said.The restaurant, located at 2950 E. Germann Road, will have several fun events including a salsa competition, margarita bar, beach games and live entertainment from 4-10 p.m.The festival is Serrano’s brainchild. He wanted to have a family-oriented event to beat the heat as well as celebrate Mexican culture.“Our goal is for everyone to have a good time and people can become a little more aware of the restaurant and the fact that we’re family owned and we do our best to help out the local community,” Serrano said.

  • AT&T offering free ice cream to students in Tempe

    AT&T is offering students from Arizona State University and other schools heading back to class free ice cream on Saturday.Students who visit the AT&T store at Tempe Marketplace will receive free ice cream provided by Cold Stone Creamery and can enter to win a new tablet. The event runs from noon to 3 p.m. at AT&T, which is located at 2000 E. Rio Salado Parkway Suite 1026.

  • Fuel prices fall again

    The coming end of the summer season has lead to a decrease in the average price to fill the tank across Arizona.AAA Arizona reports the average per-gallon price has fallen by 2.5 cents to $3.457. Tucson is at the low end at $3.316 while Flagstaff again is the most expensive at $3.701.The national average has decreased as well, with the 3.5-cent decline putting the national figure at $3.436.

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  • Engineering for Kids Summer Camp

    Engineering for Kids offering STEM Based Summer Camps at Primavera in Chandler. Announces Summer Camp Open House on May 17thWhat is East Valley Engineering for Kids?Engineering for Kids is an enrichment program that teaches concepts on a variety of engineering fields in classes and camps for kids’ ages 4-14. We want to spark an interest in the kids for science, technology and engineering. The camps are all themes based and require the kids to work in teams to address engineering challenges and problems. All programs meet national education standards for STEM and align with Common Core for math and science. Engineering for Kids has operated since 2009, is in 26 states and 4 countries. When and what is the open house for?The open house on May 17th is an opportunity for parents to come and see the facility, meet the staff from Engineering for Kids, and get their questions answered. The summer camps will be offered at Primavera Blended Learning Center at 2451 N. Arizona Avenue in Chandler. The open house is from 11 am to 3 pm.  From 1-2 pm we’re having our popular robotics workshop where the kids will build, program, test and improve the robots. At the end of the workshop, the kids will compete against each other in a Sumo Bot tournament. An RSVP is highly recommended as seating is limited. Please email your RSVP to eastvalley@engineeringforkids.net. What is Primavera Blended Learning Center?

  • Health care laws providing more access for Mesa residents

    Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Arizona’s expansion of Medicaid, health care may be more available to residents in Mesa and the rest of the East Valley than it ever has before.Since January, nearly 300,000 people across Arizona have signed up for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS). More than 120,000 Arizona residents signed up through the marketplace during the enrollment period.While these numbers are tougher to parse out to the city and county levels, it does mean a lot more people have access to affordable health care.“As a result of the growth in AHCCCS and marketplace coverage, health care systems across the state, including Banner Health, are seeing a decrease in uncompensated care,” said Corey Schubert, public relations specialist for Banner Health, in an email.That doesn’t mean that everything is coming up roses for everyone. Dr. Brent Nelson, area medical director for NextCare, says some have traded a lack of coverage for other deficits.“Anecdotally, it does appear that we see more uninsured patients now than we have in the past, but we are also seeing some of those uninsured people transition onto plans,” said Nelson. “What we also notice is that many people have a much higher deductible, so a lot of the visit charges are out-of-pocket expenses for the patients.”

  • Wine event to raise funds for animal control

    A local organization will host a wine tasting event this November in order to fund spay and neutering surgeries at the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control.The SNIFF2014 wine event will feature wine tasting, a fashion show hosted by Banana Republic at Scottsdale Fashion Square and auctions both live and silent. The first 150 who sign up also receive a VIP takeaway bag.Proceeds from the event go to support the MCACC to provide spay and neutering services to local animals.The event is on Nov. 13 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Gainey Ranch Golf Club, located at 7600 E. Gainey Club Drive in Scottsdale. To purchase tickets, or for additional information, visit sniffaz.org.

  • The Constant Traveler: Canyonlands in Utah

    Arizonans are lucky. We really don’t have to travel very far to visit one of America’s great national parks. Of course, there’s the Grand Canyon, but just north of our border in Utah, one can also find Bryce, Zion, Arches and Canyonlands.Most of us who do go to national parks, probably have hit two or three of the four mentioned Utah parks. The one that is least visited, Canyonlands, is the one that is unusually interesting in that it most resembles the Grand Canyon in structure. That’s for obvious reasons, most importantly, the Colorado River runs through it and over eons carved out the canyons that we come to see.There are other similarities as well. The Grand Canyon is divided by the Colorado River into the two sections, the North Rim and the South Rim. Most people visit the South Rim, which is all about the viewpoints that look down into the canyons. Canyonlands is the same. There are two separate areas for visitation, technically divided by the Colorado River. In the south, one can travel to the Needles/Maze area and to the completely separate north, the Island in the Sky area. Most people visit the easily accessible Island in the Sky, and here, too, it’s really all about peering down to the canyon vistas.Over 30 years ago, when I was in graduate school at the University of Utah, I traveled to Canyonlands to hike the infamous labyrinth of slot canyons, which has come to be officially called the Maze. This time, now traveling with my wife, we opted for Island in the Sky.Here’s the odd thing about Canyonlands north. You take road 191 north out of Moab, drive past Arches National Park and you fully expect to see a big sign, that if it could speak, would loudly scream, “turn here, turn here.” Instead a little sign whispers, “this way, this way.”I’m not sure why Canyonlands can’t attract the attention it needs, but if you blink you will miss the turn sign. Catch it and you head west through the break in the rock wall that has followed you since Moab.

  • Keeping the Faith: Reflexive spirituality

    Five hundred years ago there was a group of Christians living in Europe known as the Anabaptists. These are not to be confused with today’s Baptists, though the groups do share points of common history. The name Anabaptist was not so much a description as it was a condemnation.The Anabaptists were “anti-baptizers,” scorning infant baptism and a heap of other cherished church doctrines. Because of this, and their refusal to join their faith to the ruling civil powers, they were violently persecuted by governments, Catholics, and Protestants alike.One such persecution broke out in 1569 in Holland. Yes, there were some fanatics in the Anabaptist tribe, but the simple, compassionate, and innocent Jesus-followers were gobbled up as well, as is always the case. One such innocent was a man named Dirk Willems.On a winter day a bailiff was sent to arrest Dirk on the charge that he had been holding secret religious meetings in his home and had allowed others to be re-baptized there. Dirk ran for his life with the bailiff right on his heels, throwing himself across a small ice-covered lake.It held his weight as he ran, and he crossed safely to the other side. But the ice did not hold for his pursuer. The bailiff chasing after Dirk crashed through the ice into the freezing water. Dirk Willems immediately turned back and rescued the struggling man from the ice. For his kindness Dirk was immediately arrested, and after refusing to renounce his faith, was later burned at the stake.Now, here is the question asked by today’s Anabaptists: “Why did Dirk Willems turn back?” Put yourself in his vulnerable shoes. You are running for your life, the air is so cold it can freeze rivers and lakes, but the sweat is running down the small of your back. Your pursuer is so close to snatching you, you can feel his breath on your neck.

  • Are you eligible for a new Medicare Advantage Plan?

    If you have Medicare coverage, you are probably familiar with a time of year known as the Annual Enrollment Period. This is a timeframe, typically from mid-October to early December, when people who are eligible for Medicare can enroll in, disenroll from or change their Medicare Advantage plan for the upcoming year.Once you select a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have a window from January to mid-February to disenroll and return to original Medicare. You can then purchase a separate Part D Prescription Drug Plan from a private company if you would like to do so.After the enrollment and disenrollment periods end, you are locked into original Medicare or the Medicare Advantage Plan you selected for the remainder of the year. However, there are some situations that may let you make a change to your existing coverage anytime of the year if you qualify.A Special Enrollment Period allows you to make changes to your Medicare coverage as a result of a specific circumstance. You may be eligible if you:• Are clinically diagnosed with certain chronic conditions.• Are just turning 65 or gaining your eligibility for Medicare.

Video: Sunsplash Waterpark in Mesa

If you're not too chicken, there's still plenty of time this summer to drop in on the new Doub...

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