East Valley Tribune

Vote now: Best Of Gilbert 2014
prev next
 

Mesa Gilbert Chandler Tempe Queen Creek Arizona Education

  • Young man refuses to let blindness obscure lofty goals

    Tanner Robinson was a premature baby diagnosed with retinopathy of prematurity at birth. His parents were informed that he had very low vision with little chance of improvement. They were devastated and had no idea where to turn or what to do to help their firstborn.Fortunately, their doctor referred them to the Foundation for Blind Children. Tanner and his family received services regularly through the Infant Program where his parents learned how to work with him and teach him those skills that most children learn by imitating what they see.When he turned 3, Tanner started preschool. His parents said they felt a great sense of comfort knowing that they were leaving their child with qualified teachers each day who knew what their son needed to succeed.As Tanner progressed in his education, he continued receiving services from the Foundation for Blind Children including orientation and mobility training which taught him how to navigate independently using a white cane.As a teenager, Tanner participated in the College Prep Program which gave him the opportunity to live on campus at Arizona State University for several weeks during the summer and complete a college course. Tanner says that participating in College Prep helped give him the confidence to enroll in ASU once he graduated from high school.While he was attending ASU, the Foundation for Blind Children embarked on a challenge to guide blind climbers to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro and Tanner was recruited to be a member of the team. He trained with sighted guides for months ahead of time to prepare for the arduous climb. Tanner was part of the largest group of blind climbers to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in 2009 and still holds that title today.

  • Get $1 hummus nachos at Salut event

    One of our favorite appetizers in the East Valley will be available for a steal next week — and it’s got us re-arranging our schedule to be there.Salut Kitchen Bar is turning 1 year old, and the Tempe Mediterranean restaurant and wine bar will celebrate Wednesday, April 30, by offering $1 hummus nachos (normally $8) and $1 bottles of wine with the purchase of a bottle at regular price.Now that it’s getting hot out, we like our nachos with the restaurant’s Lavender Lemon Fizz, a cool cocktail served in a frosty reclaimed Bombay Sapphire bottle.For information, go to SalutKitchenBar.com.

  • Man in wheelchair rescued from Chandler wash

    Chandler Fire Department officials say a man was transported to the hospital Wednesday night after his wheelchair slid into a wash.The incident happened around 8 p.m. near the Loop 202 and McQueen Road.Fire crews were able to rescue the man who suffered only minor injuries.There is no word yet on how the man slipped into the water.

  • McClellan: Gilbert school board curtailing public comments another farce

    Here we go again.Just when things seemed to be settling down a bit, another controversy erupted with the Gilbert School Board.Dr. Jim Rice, the newest interim superintendent (the previous one resigned because he “couldn’t give the board the assistance they need”), must see part of his job to be repairing the school district’s reputation.So he regularly corresponds with employees via email, extolling the virtues of various departments. He’s instituted a “vlog,” a monthly video blog announcing the many achievements of students and employees. And he has a “Top Happenings” at each board meeting, wherein he explains the awards students and teachers earn.All good things. He should be commended for them. Gilbert is, after all, a great district by all measures.But he took it one step further, and the storm erupted again.

  • Westminster College shutting down Mesa campus due to low enrollment

    Westminster College has decided to close its Mesa campus at the end of the spring semester.Officials at the private Missouri-based institution say the decision announced Tuesday is in response to lower-than-expected enrollment and market demand.The Mesa campus opened last fall. It was the result of a partnership between the city and Westminster that followed a call by the city to attract liberal arts colleges to the growing community.After studying the market, Westminster joined with three other institutions to offer services for undergraduate students in Mesa.Westminster President George Forsythe says a number of colleges and universities have entered the Valley in the past three years, making for more competition.Westminster says it's working with the Higher Learning Commission to develop a plan to help current students continue their education.

  • Date Street expected to reopen this afternoon

    The portion of Date Street closed off yesterday due to a water main break is scheduled to reopen later today.A release sent by the city of Mesa states the section between Rio Salado Parkway and 8th Place should reopen in the midafternoon. Repairs to the water main break began on Sunday evening and required large amounts of asphalt repair work. Also scheduled to open this afternoon is the westbound right lane of Rio Salado Parkway.

  • Adventure clinics available for outdoorsy ladies

    Arizona Outdoor Women has several opportunities coming up for ladies who like to be outside:May 3: Kayaking the Verde River (Cottonwood)June 7-8: Beginner Backpacking Adventure (Payson)June 13: Twilight Kayaking (Lake Pleasant)July 12-13: Intro to Canyoneering (Mogollon Rim)The group’s one-day and weekend events provide one-on-one instruction in a hands-on setting.

  • Get $1 hummus nachos at Salut event

    One of our favorite appetizers in the East Valley will be available for a steal next week — and it’s got us re-arranging our schedule to be there.Salut Kitchen Bar is turning 1 year old, and the Tempe Mediterranean restaurant and wine bar will celebrate Wednesday, April 30, by offering $1 hummus nachos (normally $8) and $1 bottles of wine with the purchase of a bottle at regular price.Now that it’s getting hot out, we like our nachos with the restaurant’s Lavender Lemon Fizz, a cool cocktail served in a frosty reclaimed Bombay Sapphire bottle.For information, go to SalutKitchenBar.com.

  • Party at the Eastmark Pavilion

    East Valley residents are invited to Eastmark’s new concert pavilion for an afternoon of live music from the likes of Cold Shott and the Hurricane Horns, Kool Band, Silhouette Band and Static Band, along with food trucks, a splash pad for the kids, and plenty of grass for picnicking or playing tag.DETAILS >> 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, May 3. The Eastmark Great Park at Eastmark Visitors and Community Center, Ray and Ellsworth roads in Mesa. Free admission; food and beverages available for purchase. Eastmark.com.

  • Photos: Full Moon Hike

    The Full Moon Hike at Usery Mountain Regional Park on Monday, April 14. 2014.

  • 'Dead Man’s Cell Phone' rings at MCC

    Mesa Community College’s Theatre Department stages “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” an imaginative new comedy and Pulitzer Prize finalist for Best Play about a woman forced to confront her assumptions about mortality, redemption and the need to connect in a technology-obsessed world.DETAILS >> 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, April 24-25, 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26. MCC Theatre, 1833 W. Southern Ave., Mesa. $10 for adults, $7 for students and seniors. (480) 461-7172 or EZticketlive.com/mcc.

  • Family gaming events highlights scientific problem solving

    Parents and their kids ages 9-13 are invited to play video games that encourage and promote scientific problem solving at the state’s premiere family science venue. The event is free but pre-registration is required.DETAILS >> 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 26. Arizona Science Center, 600 E. Washington St., Phoenix. Free. (602) 716-2000 or AZScience.org.

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • SanTan Village installs almost 3,000 solar panels

    SanTan Village completed the installation of 2,877 solar panels on the shopping center’s rooftops.According to a press release, the panels are out of sight on the roof but are expeted to yield approximately 758 kilowatts of clean energy, or enough to power 110 homes.For more information on SanTan’s solar initiatives, visit www.shopsantanvillage.com/About/Sustainability.

  • Westminster College shutting down Mesa campus due to low enrollment

    Westminster College has decided to close its Mesa campus at the end of the spring semester.Officials at the private Missouri-based institution say the decision announced Tuesday is in response to lower-than-expected enrollment and market demand.The Mesa campus opened last fall. It was the result of a partnership between the city and Westminster that followed a call by the city to attract liberal arts colleges to the growing community.After studying the market, Westminster joined with three other institutions to offer services for undergraduate students in Mesa.Westminster President George Forsythe says a number of colleges and universities have entered the Valley in the past three years, making for more competition.Westminster says it's working with the Higher Learning Commission to develop a plan to help current students continue their education.

  • SanTan set to expand to SoCal

    The long wait for SanTan Brewing Company’s out-of-state expansion is nearly over.The Chandler-based brewery announced this week it is teaming up with Reyes Beverage Group to introduce its uniquely southwestern style craft ales to the Southern California marketplace. Distribution is expected to begin later this month.SanTan Brewing, which in 2012 was rated the country’s 14th fastest growing craft brewery by The New Yorker, plans to begin distributing its core beers — Devil’s Ale, HopShock IPA, Mr. Pineapple Wheat Beer — as well as a SanTan variety pack.The Reyes Beverage Group will SanTan reach craft beer retail and tap accounts throughout San Diego and Los Angeles. Reyes Beverage Group California beer distributorships include Crest Beverage in San Diego, Gate City Beverage Distributors in San Bernardino, Allied Beverages in Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties and Harbor Distributing in Orange County and Los Angeles.“We believe in true partnerships with friends that are committed to educating, serving and selling craft beer in America,” Anthony Canecchia, SanTan Brewing founder and brewmaster, said. “Reyes Beverage Group have undisputedly dedicated their houses to the development of the American craft revolution, which is part of our mission at SanTan Brewing.”Social media will play a key role in the launch. SanTan Brewing has set up a dedicated Facebook page to keep thirsty fans in SoCal updated on where to find SanTan beers on tap and in cans.

  • Glendale won't receive state aid for Super Bowl security

    Glendale will not be getting help from the rest of the state to cover the cost of public safety at next year's Super Bowl.On a 16-10 vote the Senate rejected legislation to reimburse the city for half of its costs, up to $2 million. Opposition came from both sides of the political aisle.Sen. Steve Farley, D-Tucson, said the issue is strictly one of who should be responsible for paying for public safety for the 2015 event.“My constituents in Tucson will not see the benefits from this bill,” he said.“People may come to these big events in the Maricopa County area,” Farley said. “Chances are they're not going to spend their money in Southern Arizona, they're not going to spend their money in Northern Arizona.”He said if there's a financial benefit, whether to Glendale or the immediate area, that is where the cost should be borne.

  • State Senate votes to remove blocks to alternative transportation services

    State senators voted 20-8 Tuesday to remove what they said are legal impediments to alternative “transportation services” like Lyft and Uber, paving the way for them to compete with taxis in Arizona.In an often-heated debate, supporters agreed that the companies – and the individuals who drive for them – should not be subject to all the same regulations as traditional taxi firms. Sen. Kelli Ward, R-Lake Havasu City, who is championing these alternatives, said there is no reason for some of the insurance and drug-testing requirements to be applied.“They're different entities,” she said, even if both provide rides. HB 2262 now goes to the House which has not considered the issue.The two companies have a business model built on ordering up rides online. Companies then send out messages to individuals who, using their own vehicles, are willing to pick up patrons and, for a fee, take them to their destination.Passengers pay the fee online, with the company forwarding a share of that to the driver.One of the big concerns is the question of whether these motorists are actually insured.

  • Bill to allow residents to bring guns into public buildings quashed by Brewer

    Arizonans will not be allowed bring their guns into public buildings, at least not this year.Gov. Jan Brewer this afternoon vetoed HB 2339 which would have allowed those who have a state-issued permit to carry a concealed weapon to ignore a “no guns” sign posted at the door. The only way a government agency could keep out all weapons would have been to install metal detectors and place armed guards at each public entrance.Separately, Brewer vetoed legislation to add more teeth to existing laws that pre-empt the right of cities to enact their own gun laws.HB 2517 would have required a court to assess a fine of up to $5,000 against any elected or appointed government official, or the head of any administrative agency, if there is a knowing and willful enactment of a local gun law that exceeds the restrictions permitted by the state.That same measure also would have precluded the use of public funds to defend or reimburse someone found guilty of breaking the law for his or her legal costs. And it would have permitted individuals and gun-rights groups to sue local officials and, if they are successful, get reimbursed for actual damages of up to $100,000.But the measure with the larger impact would have been HB 2339

Pets Food Health TV Travel

  • Young man refuses to let blindness obscure lofty goals

    Tanner Robinson was a premature baby diagnosed with retinopathy of prematurity at birth. His parents were informed that he had very low vision with little chance of improvement. They were devastated and had no idea where to turn or what to do to help their firstborn.Fortunately, their doctor referred them to the Foundation for Blind Children. Tanner and his family received services regularly through the Infant Program where his parents learned how to work with him and teach him those skills that most children learn by imitating what they see.When he turned 3, Tanner started preschool. His parents said they felt a great sense of comfort knowing that they were leaving their child with qualified teachers each day who knew what their son needed to succeed.As Tanner progressed in his education, he continued receiving services from the Foundation for Blind Children including orientation and mobility training which taught him how to navigate independently using a white cane.As a teenager, Tanner participated in the College Prep Program which gave him the opportunity to live on campus at Arizona State University for several weeks during the summer and complete a college course. Tanner says that participating in College Prep helped give him the confidence to enroll in ASU once he graduated from high school.While he was attending ASU, the Foundation for Blind Children embarked on a challenge to guide blind climbers to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro and Tanner was recruited to be a member of the team. He trained with sighted guides for months ahead of time to prepare for the arduous climb. Tanner was part of the largest group of blind climbers to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in 2009 and still holds that title today.

  • Fennel and tarragon blend in a rich clam chowder

    Many cream-based chowders suffer from the same problem — it's hard to taste anything but the cream.Admittedly, all that fat is mighty delicious. But if you're going to go to the trouble of making a chowder, wouldn't it be nice to taste some of the other ingredients? So we set about making a simple clam chowder that draws on fresh herbs to marry the various flavors.Fresh tarragon and the lightly herbaceous flavor of fresh fennel were the right choice. Both play so well with the flavors of the cream, potatoes and clams. The result is that this dish has no one flavor star, and that's as it should be. The ingredients are perfectly harmonious together.TARRAGON-FENNEL CLAM CHOWDERStart to finish: 45 minutesServings: 8

  • Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

    WASHINGTON — While scientists believe the universe began with a Big Bang, most Americans put a big question mark on the concept, an Associated Press-GfK poll found.Yet when it comes to smoking causing cancer or that a genetic code determines who we are, the doubts disappear.When considering concepts scientists consider truths, Americans have more skepticism than confidence in those that are farther away from our bodies in scope and time: global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and especially the Big Bang from 13.8 billion years ago.Rather than quizzing scientific knowledge, the survey asked people to rate their confidence in several statements about science and medicine.On some, there's broad acceptance. Just 4 percent doubt that smoking causes cancer, 6 percent question whether mental illness is a medical condition that affects the brain and 8 percent are skeptical there's a genetic code inside our cells. More — 15 percent — have doubts about the safety and efficacy of childhood vaccines.About 4 in 10 say they are not too confident or outright disbelieve that the earth is warming, mostly a result of man-made heat-trapping gases, that the Earth is 4.5 billion years old or that life on Earth evolved through a process of natural selection, though most were at least somewhat confident in each of those concepts. But a narrow majority — 51 percent — questions the Big Bang theory.

  • Aesthetics-minded Americans decry Paris love locks

    PARIS — Without love, what is Paris? And yet what is a trip to Paris without unfettered vistas of the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre or Notre Dame from bridges over the River Seine?Concerns about scenery are clashing with sentimentality in this reputed City of Love over a profusion of padlocks hitched by lovers on bridges as symbols of everlasting "amour" — locks that some decry as an eyesore.Part of a global phenomenon, the craze has grown in Paris recently and now two American women who call Paris home have had enough. They've launched a petition to try to get the city's mostly laissez-faire officials to do something. City leaders say they're exploring alternatives.In urban myth, it goes like this: Latch a padlock to a bridge railing and chuck the key into the water as you make a wish. Some say the tradition has its roots in 19th-century Hungary. Others cite a recent Italian novel as the inspiration.Campaigners Lisa Taylor Huff and Lisa Anselmo are denouncing what they call a padlock plague, warning of alleged safety risks and arguing the craze is now a cliche. Their petition, at www.change.org , says "the heart of Paris has been made ugly" by the locks and the Seine has been polluted by thousands of keys.Plus, they say, tourists shouldn't be fooled: The locks aren't forever. City crews regularly remove them as they replace damaged structures. One strained rail weighing 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds) was recently taken down, a Paris official said.

  • Bee-friendly garden can help struggling species

    Bees are pulling a disappearing act. Honeybees are vanishing from their hives. Bumblebee numbers have crashed so radically that some species are believed extinct. Even native solitary bees are in decline. Food supplies dependent upon pollinators are threatened.But gardeners can help.There is no single explanation for what is causing the pollinator losses, said Matt O'Neal, an associate professor of entomology at Iowa State University."There are multiple sources of stress," he said. "There are your basic pests, also pathogens like viruses, pesticide exposure and land use practices reducing the kinds of forages bees can feed on. It looks like a combination of all those."As insect pollinators, bees broaden our diets beyond meats and wind-pollinated grains. An estimated one-third of all foods and beverages are made possible by pollination, mainly by honeybees, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says. Pollinators also are essential for flowering plants and entire plant communities."Common species are disappearing at a dramatic rate. I'm terrified in the extreme," said Mace Vaughan, pollinator program director with The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in Portland, Ore. "I worry in particular about pollinator species with limited ranges and that have unique habitat requirements that are being threatened. A lot of species are dropping out of the landscape."

  • A springtime take on the classic crabcake

    As the weather gets warmer, I cook lighter. And in The Husband's taxonomy of food, crabcakes are relatively light. So I thought I'd employ of couple of seasonal stars — peas and radishes — to put a spring spin on them.I blithely went shopping for fresh crabmeat at my local market, but found to my horror that it's almost unaffordably pricey — and that pasteurized refrigerated crabmeat isn't much cheaper. In search of an ingredient with which to stretch the crab (I thought of it as Crab Helper), I settled on boiled shrimp, which are readily available, but not astronomically expensive. Happily, the crab and the shrimp played very nicely together.As this also is the season for fresh peas, I added some of them to the crab/shrimp mix. Their natural sweetness chimes in well with the shellfish, and they add a little crunchy pop to the texture of the cakes.Flavor and texture aside, I used to discount the nutritional value of peas, until I finally scrutinized the data and discovered that the little fellers are packed with protein, fiber and micronutrients. If you find fresh peas at the farmer's market, by all means scoop them up. But keep in mind that the sugar in fresh peas starts turning to starch the minute they're harvested, so be sure to bring them home, shell them and boil them right away.And if your only option is frozen peas, don't despair. Those guys are picked at the height of their ripeness and blanched immediately in water, which sets their flavor and texture.We bind up the cakes with eggs, mayonnaise and panko breadcrumbs, then season them with tarragon, which always teams up nicely with both shellfish and peas. If you're not a fan of tarragon, which is unpleasantly reminiscent of licorice to some folks, substitute some dill, chives or parsley. The panko does double duty, thickening the interior of the cakes and adding crunch to their crust. And as long as you brown the cakes in a nonstick or stick-resistant skillet, you won't have to use much oil.

Local Guitar Group Meets in Downtown Mesa

A local guitar group based in Mesa, Ariz. meets every other sunday for musical fun, community,...

Facebook

EastValleyTribune.com on Facebook

Twitter

EastValleyTribune.com on Twitter

Google+

EastValleyTribune.com on Google+

RSS

Subscribe to EastValleyTribune.com via RSS

RSS Feeds

Spacer4px
Your Az Jobs
Loading…